Books

The Munro family of Otematata still drove their sheep over the Lindis Pass to fresh grazing areas several times a year.  Photo by Lyndon Ferry.

Spotlight on droving way of life

When it comes to chronicling New Zealand's agricultural history, much has been written about the role of shepherds and stockmen.

Convincing account of personal discovery

Convincing account of personal discovery

This is a memoir spanning the first year of employment for an English graduate who had no great expectations of obtaining a job until a random encounter at a party led her to an agent and a surprise offer of work from one of the most prestigious literary agencies in America.

Retaining interest a challenge

Retaining interest a challenge

This continues the series started with The Long Earth and The Long War. 

Tale to break your heart

Tale to break your heart

This beautifully told tale in small-format novella form has been translated from the Italian by Stephen Twilley.

Anti-hero hits the paydirt

Anti-hero hits the paydirt

Anti-heroes can usually be relied upon to provide entertainment and Australian author Jock Serong has hit paydirt with his choice in Charlie Jardim.

Theories in lieu of facts on missing flight

Theories in lieu of facts on missing flight

''The Pope - No News.'' So trumpeted placards for the London Star evening newspaper in a flat patch many moons ago (it worked).  

Soldiers' words and photos from WW1 front lines

Soldiers' words and photos from WW1 front lines

This year marks the centenary of the outbreak of World War 1. This has been the start of many commemorations across the world, not the least of which will be next year's centenary of the Gallipoli landing.

Gen Xers summon demons

Gen Xers summon demons

The cover of my copy of Demons says it is ''social satire'', but I didn't notice this until I'd finished the book. It didn't seem all that satirical to me, more like a call for help and a call to arms.

Fast-paced and inventive slice of dystopia

Fast-paced and inventive slice of dystopia

This follow-up by Hugh Howey to his Silo trilogy is every bit as dystopian as its predecessor; a fast-paced, inventive sci-fi novel set in a futuristic America where civilisation has been buried deep beneath a barren desert (there are distinct echoes of China Mieville throughout). 

Art, mystery and war shape well-written novel

Art, mystery and war shape well-written novel

There is a particular style of novel writing which places the story in two timeframes. Sometimes this can be irritating but in this case Barbara Erskine makes it work very well.