Bruce Munro

In the grip of addiction

In the grip of addiction

Pornography addiction is still controversial, but it is undeniable for those living within its destructive reach. Bruce Munro talks to a sex therapist about this rapidly escalating problem and presents the stories of two Otago people burnt by porn in different ways. 

A taxing problem

A taxing problem

The Panama Papers have pulled the scab off festering anger about growing wealth inequities. Is it time for the return of death taxes? Bruce Munro investigates.

Saving our seas

Saving our seas

What we do not know about our marine environment is as compelling a reason for establishing marine protection areas as what we do know, marine scientist Dr Chris Hepburn says. But first, real buy-in from the public is needed, environment lawyer Maree Baker-Galloway tells Bruce Munro. 

Joy and the art of singing opera

Joy and the art of singing opera It's not always easy maintaining the joy of making music when it is your livelihood, a candid Jonathan Lemalu tells Bruce Munro before a gala performance in the Dunedin.

Francophiles' fantasies fulfilled

Francophiles' fantasies fulfilled

Film as only the French can do is back on the big screen, writes Bruce Munro.

Flagging change

Flagging change

Flag referendum? Forget it. Here's six things we would much rather change, writes Bruce Munro.

Shining lights

Shining lights

It is a lovely conjunction; the master and the former apprentice holding exhibitions in the same part of the country at the same time. Bruce Munro talks to world-renowned New Zealand glass artist Ann Robinson and her heir apparent Mike Crawford.

Critical clauses

Critical clauses

The only institutions in New Zealand mandated by law to "tell it like it is" are being told by government departments to "be seen but not heard", say academics who fear it is harming people, the environment and democracy. Government and university representatives, however, say it's not a problem. Bruce Munro investigates suppression clauses in government contracts with university researchers.

Shooting the breeze

Shooting the breeze

In a world where old and new seem locked in mortal combat, here is a true tale of their mellifluous symbiosis. Bruce Munro goes sailing with a British artist and a Dunedin illustrations assistant who have used 21st-century technology to forge an old-fashioned friendship.

Confronting the killer among us

Confronting the killer among us

Edwin Wright is pleased to be returning to Dunedin to play a mass murderer on the stage that gave him a life worth living. The leftwing actor tells Bruce Munro why he believes we need to hear the words and thoughts of far-right killer Anders Behring Breivik.