Bruce Munro

Bucking the trend

Bucking the trend

Youth at risk of long-term welfare dependency is still our number one social issue, say those at the coalface. But Otago has found a way to significantly buck the trend, writes Bruce Munro.

'Successful' fall in youth on welfare

'Successful' fall in youth on welfare

A campaign to get Dunedin youth off welfare is a startling success.

What lies beneath

What lies beneath

Now submerged by Lake Mahinerangi, west of Dunedin, the township of Waipori has a fascinating history, writes Bruce Munro.

O Christmas tree

O Christmas tree

Do you want your children to continue the tradition of pine Christmas trees dripping with tinsel, lights and angels? Then put a bit of effort into creating your own unconventional Christmas trees, writes Bruce Munro.

Going cruelty free

Going cruelty free

The vegans are rising, with a message of animal equality and planetary salvation. Do we all need to turn vegan in order to treat animals well and avoid environmental disaster? Meat-eater Bruce Munro goes hunting for answers.  

Turning over a new leaf

Turning over a new leaf

He grew up in state care; a life of dislocation and abuse. It is no surprise he ended up in a gang and spent half his life in prison. The miracle is that he has not been back inside for 15 years.

Making a difference

Making a difference

The gentle, keep-cool-'til-after-school guy we all felt we knew growing up, is on a mission to rehabilitate hardened criminals and help everyone create the life they want. Olly Ohlson, now living in Dunedin, tells BRUCE MUNRO his surprising story and shares his passionate vision.

Quite a catch

Quite a catch

Hitting bookshop shelves like a 10.9kg brick is the fascinating four-volume compendium The Fishes of New Zealand. It is exactly the resource that co-author and ichthyophile Andrew Stewart wanted as a child, he tells Bruce Munro.

Knowing Ngai Tahu

Knowing Ngai Tahu

Their tribal area is the biggest in New Zealand. They have turned a $170 million Treaty Settlement into a $1 billion-and-climbing wealth fund. And they are about to stage a massive festival in Dunedin. But success is stirring some searching questions about what it means to be Ngai Tahu, writes Bruce Munro. 

Meeting the whanau

Meeting the whanau

Dunedin is to become Ngai Tahu central. From Friday, iwi members from throughout the South Island and beyond, will gather in the city for Hui-a-Iwi; a biennial celebration of all things Ngai Tahu.