Dene Mackenzie

Compensation unlikely, lawyer says

Compensation unlikely, lawyer says

Aorangi investors who have their investments with the Allan Hubbard-linked company are unlikely to receive any government compensation for lost income or hardship, Dunedin lawyer Sally Peart says.

Markets sliding from attack of nerves

Nervous investors around the world contributed to falling sharemarkets in almost every country, but the fall in the NZX-50 was limited by low volumes as investors kept their hands in their pockets.

Hubbard investors' fund grows

Nearly $40,000 had been raised from the public to help Aorangi investors most in need, a spokesman for the Hubbard Support Fund Trust, John Funnell, said yesterday.

Govt's partnership push draws positive response

Govt's partnership push draws positive response

Public sector decision-making concerned with infrastructure investment will now have to consider public private partnerships, a move which is likely to find widespread industry support.

Hubbard probe could hit MPs

Hubbard probe could hit MPs

Southern National MPs should brace for some hard questions if, as expected, the Serious Fraud Office fails in its quest to prove South Canterbury businessman Allan Hubbard committed fraud.

Fed's worries about economic recovery hit markets

Sharemarkets could be in for a rocky few days after the United States Federal Reserve stepped in yesterday to try and drive down debt and boost economic growth.

Floating rates rise, fixed rates lag

Mortgage lending rates are on the move again, but not in the way earlier predicted.

Retailing continues to be flat

Retailing continues to be flat

Households are likely to remain cautious with their spending after recent labour market data showed subdued wage growth as unemployment soared to 6.8%.

BlackBerry tests Saudi servers

BlackBerry tests Saudi servers

Blackberry maker Research in Motion appeared to be closer to a resolution in its dispute with Saudi Arabia over the Canadian firm's popular messaging services.

New generation of spam using shortened URLs

Most internet security firms release in January their predictions of what nasties will invade our computers during the year.