Shane Gilchrist

The long road back

The long road back

For some, the impacts of a serious crash linger long after the incident is a distant memory, writes Shane Gilchrist.

Tales from the road

Tales from the road

Ever the magpie, Dunedin musician, writer and film-maker Bill Morris is drawn to tales of many kinds, some of which can be found on his new album Hinterland, writes Shane Gilchrist.

All the elements

All the elements

Amid the cool electronic textures and funk grit of Kody Nielson's latest album lies a jazz underbelly. As Shane Gilchrist discovers, the Kiwi musical adventurer has gone back to the future under a new moniker, Silicon. 

Should have gone to rehab

Should have gone to rehab

If there is one memory of Amy that burns brightest, it is of the late jazz-soul-pop star as a teen.

Chapter and prose

Chapter and prose

The life, thoughts and deeds of James K. Baxter have been chronicled via his prose rather than his poetry, by a man who has been both friend to and scholar of the New Zealand literary great, writes Shane Gilchrist.

National treasures

National treasures

In The Lives of Colonial Objects, even the seemingly ordinary can offer exceptional insights. And, as Shane Gilchrist discovers, cultural value can be counted in various ways.

Dreams and reality

Dreams and reality

Don't judge an album by its cover. The Phoenix Foundation's sixth studio effort is a defiant statement of intent from New Zealand's enduring sonic voyagers, writes Shane Gilchrist.

From the heart

From the heart

New Zealand-born, Australia-based film-maker Margot Nash's latest project, The Silences, could hardly have been more personal, writes Shane Gilchrist.

Making Connections

Making Connections

Having roamed from ground-breaking 1980 play Foreskin's Lament to crime fiction and places in between, Greg McGee traverses time and the spaces of northern Italy in his new book, writes Shane Gilchrist.

Bringing music to the world

Bringing music to the world

Former Dunedin, now Auckland-based, film-maker Rebecca Tansley's latest project celebrates a little known classical pianist, much of its resonance having to do with the man rather than the music, writes Shane Gilchrist.