Shane Gilchrist

Stepping out

Stepping out

The most popular recreational pursuit in New Zealand, walking offers many benefits. Shane Gilchrist puts one foot in front of the other. 

Dog days

Dog days

Walking the dog can lead to greater wellbeing, Shane Gilchrist writes.

Light from the edges

Light from the edges

Shane Gilchrist discusses a new exhibition with a pair of emerging artists who take the concept of reflection to a deeper level.

Eye on top trophy

Eye on top trophy

Dunedin country music artist Kelvin Cummings heads to Norfolk Island on Saturday looking to add to his recent haul of awards.

Putting on the ritz

Putting on the ritz

As this year's high school formal season gets into full swing, Shane Gilchrist talks to some teens for whom it seems the big night is more about resourcefulness and respect than romance. 

CD reviews: Anika Moa

CD reviews: Anika Moa

Taniwha, witches, dreams and gender-switching kids ... Anika Moa has done it again, aiming for the ears of young ones while offering more than enough lyrical depth to make the adults chuckle, too.

A labour of long gestation

A labour of long gestation

Andrea Bosshard's latest effort, The Great Maiden's Blush might explore big themes, yet the Kiwi film-maker is not interested in making big statements, Shane Gilchrist writes. 

Travels and transience

Travels and transience

Scottish artist Jen Smith's first Dunedin exhibition documents not only her travels but also the kindness of strangers, writes Shane Gilchrist.

Review: Dark sonic delights from Sabbath

Review: Dark sonic delights from Sabbath

It was a mass featuring variations on black: from the themes and imagery of fire, war, an afterlife spent above, below or somewhere in between;to the clothes of both band and crowd; to the freight-train power of Black Sabbath, who tore a hole in the night and, via singer and protaganist Ozzy Osbourne, invited us to jump on in.

The fog of war

The fog of war

A century after the New Zealand Government declared April 25 a holiday in recognition of the dead of Gallipoli, we are still coming to grips with the campaign, writes Shane Gilchrist.