Otago Daily Times: Magazine

A nip in the Antarctic

Climate change is on the march under the seas of the Antarctic, and it is armed with claws, Kathryn Smith writes.

There are no holidays on the road to fitness

There are no holidays on the road to fitness

Time in the gym is paying dividends at home.

Preserved whiff of the past

Preserved whiff of the past

An old tin can dug up in Dunedin, although foreign, is a reminder of early industry in the city, writes Peter Read.

Selling our schools

Selling our schools

Nothing epitomises our market-oriented education system like the frenzy of school open days and open nights. Bruce Munro pauses amid all the hype to ask whether this brand-driven, competitive model is the best way to give our children a high-quality education.

Clearing the air

Transport offers avenues for cutting our carbon consumption.

Seeing the funning side

Having a laugh might be the most sensible thing you can do today.

In it for the long haul

Making the decision to have a child is to decide to have your heart go walking around outside your body forever, to quote Elizabeth Stone.

Making Connections

Making Connections

Having roamed from ground-breaking 1980 play Foreskin's Lament to crime fiction and places in between, Greg McGee traverses time and the spaces of northern Italy in his new book, writes Shane Gilchrist.

Region of the perpendicular

Region of the perpendicular

The Milford Track in Fiordland is New Zealand's premier Great Walk. In late April, towards the end of the main season, Dunedin writer Neville Peat experienced its stunning scenery, convivial character and extreme weather, and along the way saluted its glorious tramping history.

On dopamine high, skiing with Khaleesi

Over the school holidays, now drawing to an exhausted close, I have given up Facebook and taken up skiing.

Riding out the rough times

The saying goes you can have results or excuses, but not both.

Bringing books to the Yasawas

Bringing books to the Yasawas

Bringing books to the YasawasBeing a ''volun-tourist'' can be very rewarding, writes Gillian Vine.

Visit to mine a blast

Visit to mine a blast

There was magic down a mine for 9-year-old Trevor Kempton.

The West Coast was my family's regular holiday destination.

Just after Christmas each year we packed the green and white tent, hitched the trailer behind the Vauxhall Velox and headed off for the ''coast'' with no set itinerary.

Mum had an insatiable thirst for knowledge.

Riding out the rough times

The saying goes you can have results or excuses, but not both.

Lessons provide alternatives

Lessons provide alternatives

Concern about food generally begins in one of two places.

Just what the doctors ordered

High St's association with the medical profession dates back to at least the 1880s, when the Mornington cable car started running and some impressive new houses were built along its route.

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