Otago Daily Times: Magazine

Matters of taste ... and smell

Matters of taste ... and smell

Rose oil is good for numerous things beginning with every letter in the alphabet, Liz Breslin writes.

Fete in their hands

It was a day to remember when the '60s arrived at a West Coast school fete, writes Alan Beck. 

Sticking it to cancer

Sticking it to cancer

A chance meeting at the dog park saved Australian theatre-maker and puppeteer Lana Schwarcz's life. She tells Rebecca Fox how much she is looking forward to coming to the Dunedin Fringe Festival. 

Family life, or 'family-lite'?

Family life, or 'family-lite'?

Taking time to do things together as a family is important, parenting columnist Ian Munro writes. 

A Treaty for our times

A Treaty for our times

What is the future of the Treaty of Waitangi after the apologies and economic redress? Many will be surprised to discover significant political and legal change could lie just over the horizon. But the public has nothing to fear and much to gain, those involved tell Bruce Munro.

The tale of a stoat

The tale of a stoat

Orokonui conservation manager Elton Smith tells the story of the 2015 battle against stoats at the ecosanctuary. 

Wrestling with the branding

Wrestling with the branding

While we furiously brand ourselves before taking to nature, it might be nature that could do with a new brand, Leigh Paterson writes.

Five questions with: John Bradley

Five questions with: John Bradley

John Bradley has hung up his rain gauge after 40 years without missing a day. Without fail, the 78-year-old former deputy principal at Balaclava school took rain gauge readings and provided wind and cloud information for the MetService from January 1, 1976 to December 31, 2015. 

Back to school no fun for bullied

Back to school no fun for bullied

School will shortly be back, and there will be many children who won't be looking forward to it, parenting columnist Ian Munro writes.

Uneasy vision of future

Uneasy vision of future

A Dunedin Public Art Gallery favourite spoke to the realities of 1970s New Zealand, writes Lauren Gutsell.

Otago students immune to politically incorrect malady

Otago students immune to politically incorrect malady

It's that time of year again. When the tarseal winces and lounge suites start looking nervous, Lisa Scott writes.

Overcome fear to make 2016 your year

Overcome fear to make 2016 your year

After having boldly decided on some goals/intentions to work towards achieving this year, it's not uncommon to get the speed wobbles and start to doubt whether or not you can really achieve what you want to, life coach Jan Aitken writes.

Five questions with: John Bradley

Five questions with: John Bradley

John Bradley has hung up his rain gauge after 40 years without missing a day. Without fail, the former deputy principal at Balaclava school took rain gauge readings and provided wind and cloud informtion for the Met Service every day from January 1, 1976 to December 31, 2015. Mr Bradley and his wife are retiring to Mosgiel.

Bucking the trend

Bucking the trend

Youth at risk of long-term welfare dependency is still our number one social issue, say those at the coalface. But Otago has found a way to significantly buck the trend, writes Bruce Munro.

Guided by the past

Guided by the past

For thousands of years Pacific peoples navigated double-hulled voyaging canoes over the ocean. Those skills and that knowledge has been rediscovered and are alive and well in Hawkes Bay, Charmian Smith discovers.

Surprise trip for wedding super

Surprise trip for wedding super

There's nothing like being there.

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