$2000 grant to create garden 'icing on the cake' for school

Rural Women New Zealand member Lorraine Sheen,  Hororata School board of trustees chairman Rodney Booth (centre) and Farmlands district sales manager Doug Maginness check out the site where Hororata School's garden will soon be created, with pupils (from left) Oliver Blackburn (9), 
Hamish Thornley (9), Blake Booth (6) and Jessie Smith (5). Photo by David Hill
Rural Women New Zealand member Lorraine Sheen, Hororata School board of trustees chairman Rodney Booth (centre) and Farmlands district sales manager Doug Maginness check out the site where Hororata School's garden will soon be created, with pupils (from left) Oliver Blackburn (9), Hamish Thornley (9), Blake Booth (6) and Jessie Smith (5). Photo by David Hill

Hororata School is growing and a grant to create a school garden is just what the children need.

Board of trustees chairman Rodney Booth said the $2000 grant received on the last day of term, April 17, from Rural Women New Zealand and Farmlands had given the school a welcome boost.

''These are the things that put the icing on the cake. We've put a lot of time into the grounds and we've spent $10,000 on the [sports] court and resurfacing and getting the school looking nice.

''Being rural kids they are right into their growing and that sort of stuff, so the garden will be a real asset to the school. This grant really helps us along and it's much appreciated.''

Rural Women New Zealand member Lorraine Sheen and Farmlands district sales manager Doug Maginness attended a school assembly on Thursday, April 17, to present the cheque to Mr Booth.

Hororata School was one of three rural Canterbury schools to receive a $2000 grant to develop a school garden, the others being Waihao Downs (near Waimate) and Swannanoa (near Rangiora) Schools.

Mr Booth said the school planned to build a tunnel house as part of the project and he was looking for volunteers to get it started. The school intended to cook a meal from what the children grew and was also looking for donations of lambs, he said.

Hororata was a growing district and with the Central Plains water scheme canals going ahead, he expected more families to move into the area, Mr Booth said.

''We would like to see the school keep growing and we want to provide a state-of-the-art facility to help the children reach their learning potential. We will be introducing more computer technology soon, so it will be right up there once we've got that done.''

- by David Hill