Just dance at Hotline 666

Christian McNab has arranged three dance parties under the Unofficial Club Six banner, all at The Manor, a musician’s residence that transforms into a venue semi-regularly for experimental and electronic gigs. Photo: Getty Images
Christian McNab has arranged three dance parties under the Unofficial Club Six banner, all at The Manor, a musician’s residence that transforms into a venue semi-regularly for experimental and electronic gigs. Photo: Getty Images

Usually when I drag myself off the couch and out the door to a gig on a Saturday night I expect to see three or four guys playing a couple of guitars, one of them on the drums, one of them probably singing, and a crowd of people moving their heads slightly and chugging their pricey bar drinks. Usually I’m in that crowd.

Tonight will be different.

‘‘It’s just about dancing,’’ confesses Christian McNab. He’s the main guy behind Unofficial Club Six, which is hosting Hotline 666, an electronic music gig tonight at None Gallery.

‘‘Dancing is my favourite thing to do, so I hope other people enjoy it as well.’’

Christian has arranged three dance parties under the Unofficial Club Six banner, all at The Manor, a musician’s residence that transforms into a venue semi-regularly for experimental and electronic gigs.

Christian reckons this sort of gig doesn’t work as well in traditional bar venues, and I agree. Seeing an experimental musician such as L$D Fundraiser at the Crown Hotel, for example, there’s always a sense that some of the crowd would prefer to be drinking and having a yarn, and that creates tension between the performer and the people in the space.

‘‘I don’t like the relationship between music, especially experimental music, and drinking,’’ Christian explains.

‘‘So what I’ll hopefully do is have a nice environment where the performer will be removed to enable the sound to just have a functional purpose.’’

I get the impression that it’s not the type of music traditionally celebrated by music journalism, which is more about the performer. Instead it’s about using sound to create the best possible environment to participate in a shared experience.

There’s a diverse range of sounds on offer, too. Speed Boat, one half of house duo Sandboards, will be playing a house set, sibling duo Back on Track will perform, as will Perry Buoy, with a rare ambient set, and Vanessa Worm will make her debut.

I spoke to Vanessa Worm, aka Tessa Forde, to try to figure out what to expect from her performance tonight.

‘‘It’s very hard to explain because it’s very new. It’s a bit of a different sound.

‘‘I kind of get into the zone and everything else just blocks out. I just put my heart into it, it’s just whatever feels right.

‘‘It ends up something weird, kind of repetitive, but building, disjointed . ..’’

I’m none the wiser, but intrigued as hell.

Alongside the producers and DJs administering the aural component there will be two dedicated light performers, Leben Young and Nikki Cain, providing visual stimuli.

‘‘I guess I’m influenced by the nostalgia for the golden rave days or something . . .’’ Christian jokes. ‘‘Maybe not quite like that, but I guess with dance music it’s really nice having a full sensory experience, so visual is really important, too.

‘‘With this line-up it’s kind of bringing together different groups of people so that everyone can just dance.

‘‘You don’t have to dance, but it’s dance music.’’

 - by Fraser Thompson

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