Preliminary designs revealed for Christchurch stadium

Preliminary designs for the Canterbury Multi-Use Arena interior Photo: Supplied / Christchurch City Council
Preliminary designs for the Canterbury Multi-Use Arena interior Photo: Supplied / Christchurch City Council
Christchurch City Council has revealed four preliminary design images for the long-awaited 30,000 seat Canterbury Multi-Use Arena.

The preliminary designs are the first images to be published since the project's investment case was first approved at the end of 2019.

The arena will occupy much of the central Christchurch site bordered by Hereford, Barbadoes, Tuam and Madras streets.

The project's delivery board have committed to delivering the arena by no later than 30 June 2025

The new design images from Christchurch-based architects Warren & Mahoney and international stadium design experts Populous, illustrate how the city's long awaited arena will sit on the central city site.

The designs also provide Cantabrians with a peek into what the arena could like from the stands during a sporting event.

Aerial view of the proposed Canterbury Multi Use Arena Photo: Supplied / Christchurch City Council
Aerial view of the proposed Canterbury Multi Use Arena Photo: Supplied / Christchurch City Council

CMUA Project Delivery board chair Barry Bragg says the preliminary designs, developed by the Kōtui consortium, provide the most accurate picture yet of what the facility will look like once completed.

"These designs crystallise our vision for the CMUA to be the most modern, fit-for-purpose arena in the country - a facility that leads the way from an innovation and sustainability perspective.

"We know people are really excited about the prospect of having a covered arena in the heart of the city and we hope these preliminary designs will capture people's imaginations and give them a glimpse of what is to come.

"We are well on the way towards delivering Christchurch a world-class covered arena with high-quality acoustics that is capable of hosting top international music concerts as well as major international sporting fixtures,'' Bragg said.

At 232 metres long, 195 metres wide and 36 metres high at its tallest point, the arena will have a seating capacity of 30,000 for sporting events with capacity rising up to 37,800 for concerts.

Preliminary design showing the West entry to the Canterbury Multi-Use Arena Photo: Supplied / Christchurch City Council
Preliminary design showing the West entry to the Canterbury Multi-Use Arena Photo: Supplied / Christchurch City Council

Bragg said the designs for the arena have changed from the initial 2019 concepts to better suit a range of factors including: seismic requirements, health of the turf, fan experience and multi-use functionality.

The new designs also aimed to maximise the sunlight and minimise the noise impacts for surrounding properties.

Architects have opted for an 'oculus-style' roof that is designed as an independent structure to increase its strength. Meanwhile, the dome shape is supposed to provide extra rigidity to the stadium's roof diaphragm.

Christchurch City councillors will meet to approve the complete preliminary design package in January, with the developed design scheduled to be completed by April.

The council will then decide whether to approve the design and construction contract in the middle of 2022.

At their next meeting the council will also consider accepting the name 'Te Kaharoa', which Ngāi Tūāhuriri has gifted to the entire block of land that will hold the arena. Te Kaharoa means 'enduring strength'.

As the name is for the land, it would not limit any future conversations with potential sponsors seeking naming rights for the arena, a council spokesperson said.

Aerial view of the proposed Canterbury Multi Use Arena Photo: Supplied / Christchurch City Council
Aerial view of the proposed Canterbury Multi Use Arena Photo: Supplied / Christchurch City Council

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