Kew to help protect Australia's bio-diversity after wildfires

Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank works as an insurance policy against plant extinction so they can be...
Kew’s Millennium Seed Bank works as an insurance policy against plant extinction so they can be protected for the future. Photo: Getty Images
Britain is to help protect Australia's biodiversity in the emergency collection of plant seeds following the country's devastating wildfires.

Scientists from the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in London will help with emergency seed-collecting in areas devastated by the bushfires and store specimens at its Millennium Seed Bank (MSB) in Britain.

Kew’s MSB works as an insurance policy against plant extinction so they can be protected for the future.

Seeds are stored in air-tight glass containers stacked in huge -20 degrees Celsius freezers and can be used to grow a new generation of plants in years to come.

For the collecting, Kew scientists will work alongside colleagues in the Australian Seed Bank Partnership.

"We ... are pleased to be able to support their efforts, as part of our ongoing partnership to address biodiversity loss through seed-banking in Australia," said the MSB's Elinor Breman in a statement.

She added: "Kew’s scientists will work with the ASBP to conduct emergency seed-collecting in areas devastated by the bushfires and longer-term germination research, which will hopefully aid the international effort to restore habitats more quickly in this precious and biodiverse region.”

Kew has worked with Australian seed banks since 2000, sharing expertise on seed collection processes, conservation and research so that the seeds of plant species considered rare or threatened can be banked and conserved for the future.

So far, 12,450 seed collections representing 8,900 Australian species, all of which are saved in local seed banks, have been duplicated and stored in Kew’s MSB.

Australia's wildfires have burned through an area the size of Greece since September, in what the government there has called an ecological disaster.

The protected species of Wollemi Pines - prehistoric trees which outlived the dinosaurs - survived the wildfires.

Others were not so lucky: wood-chopping company Kangaroo Island Plantation Timbers suspended trading in its shares after severe fire-damage meant 90% of its tree crop was no longer productive.

The collaboration with Kew was announced by visiting British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab.

"This further collaboration between the Australian Seed Bank Partnership and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, will help protect Australia's precious biodiversity following the terrible bushfires," Raab said. 

Add a Comment

drivesouth-pow-generic-1.png

Our journalists are your neighbours

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Become a Supporter