Mornington Welfare Association

Mr Peter Ireland's Ayrshires exhibited at the Waitati and Waikouaiti shows. From left: First prize three-year-old cow in milk and reserve champion; first prize for cow and two progeny; first prize and champion cow in milk. - Otago Witness, 26.2.1919.
Mr Peter Ireland's Ayrshires exhibited at the Waitati and Waikouaiti shows. From left: First prize three-year-old cow in milk and reserve champion; first prize for cow and two progeny; first prize and champion cow in milk. - Otago Witness, 26.2.1919.
Over 100 Mornington residents met together last night in the old Council Chambers, discussed the disabilities under which it was alleged this district suffered, and formed a Welfare Association, whose purpose will be to promote the interests of Mornington, particularly with reference to the extension of the main tramway line.

Mr E. E. Nicolson was voted to the chair, and Mr J. Rattray was appointed secretary of the meeting. Discussion centred almost entirely around tramway extension matters, and the general opinion seemed to be that the tramway should traverse the borough to the top of the hill.

The Chairman said, in his opening remarks, that no tramways could be laid down in any section without giving special advantages to that section as opposed to other districts. Mornington had been badly laid out, with the result that residents had to wend their way to their homes through devious by-ways.

One of the main reasons for the carrying of the main line to the top of the hill was that Mornington should be opened up by a wide thoroughfare. Once this was obtained the district would go ahead, since the beauty of the borough was unquestioned, and residents, once established therein, showed little inclination to leave.

There was only one way to get these matters put right. Mornington had joined the city with a bad name. He believed that it did not deserve that bad name, but, however that might be, unthinking city councillors had since that time tended to regard Mornington in a bad light - to regard the borough as bankrupt, etc.

It devolved on the residents of Mornington to band themselves together with a united front and battle for what was right. It was proposed that residents should band themselves together in a league, or Welfare Association, which might go to the City Council and strengthen its hands.

Mr Carolin moved that a Mornington Welfare Association should be formed, the principle object whereof should be the extension of the Mornington tramway line. The motion was seconded by Mr Gardiner, and carried unanimously, with applause.

Owaka hospital sought

A petition containing over 200 signatures, was received from the Owaka and surrounding districts asking that a cottage hospital be erected at Owaka.

It was pointed out that the unfortunate experience the residents of those districts had gone through during the influenza epidemic showed the urgent necessity for a central place from which professional advice and assistance could be readily available, and also in the case of accidents, which were frequent owing to the class of work in which a great number of the people were engaged. - The matter was referred to the Finance Committee for report.

Hindu crews

During the last few weeks there have been an unusually large number of Hindus about the streets of Auckland. These men are now being employed on overseas ships. The steamer Burma has a large number of these Indians on board, whom she shipped when the vessel was at Calcutta.

The Hindu makes a good deck hand, besides being particularly active. The rate of pay is small as compared with the amount paid for white labour. Lately a number of boats that have come to Auckland have been manned largely by native labour. The Ceylon was manned by native workers, the captain and staff being the only Europeans on board.

- ODT, 21.2.1919.

COPIES OF PICTURE AVAILABLE FROM ODT FRONT OFFICE, LOWER STUART ST, OR WWW.OTAGOIMAGES.CO.NZ

Add a Comment