Pacific missionary endeavours

Bluejackets carry the casket containing the body of the martyred nurse, Edith Cavell, from the wharf at Dover. Immediately behind the casket are (from left): Miss Scott Cavell (sister), Dr Wainwright (brother-in-law) and Mrs Wainwright (sister). - Otago W
Bluejackets carry the casket containing the body of the martyred nurse, Edith Cavell, from the wharf at Dover. Immediately behind the casket are (from left): Miss Scott Cavell (sister), Dr Wainwright (brother-in-law) and Mrs Wainwright (sister). - Otago Witness, 16.7.1919
The Rev. M. A. Rugby Pratt presided over a missionary meeting in the Trinity Methodist Church last night, when the Rev. W. A. Sinclair (Foreign Mission Secretary for the Methodist Church) delivered a thoughtful and convincing address on the opportunities now offered to Christian Missionary enterprise in many lands, especially in the Pacific Islands.

The combined choirs of the Trinity and Central Mission Churches assisted in the service of praise. Rev. Sinclair said the most extensive missionary work in the Pacific was carried on by the Methodist Church.

In the islands groups of Tonga, Samoa, Fiji, Papua, New Britain, and the Solomons there were 1114 churches and over 600 other church buildings. There were over 40 missionaries at work, and 4000 native missionary teachers.

The church membership was 50,000 and 30,000 children attended the church public schools. Pointing to the results of all this organisation and labour, the speaker stated that in the Solomons 343 persons had been received into fellowship last year.

A great deal, he continued, remained to be done in the older missionary stations, such as Fiji, in civilising the natives and bringing them up to the standard of Christian living.

Chinese flag presentation

A unique presentation was made in the City Council chambers last night, when two Chinese residents waited on the Mayor and asked his acceptance of a Chinese flag on behalf of the citizens of Dunedin. Mr Sincock, who acted as spokesman, apologised for the absence of the Rev. A. Don.

The speaker said that the Chinese residents in Dunedin wished to present their national flag to the citizens of the town, and he hoped that on Peace Day the flag would be flown in a prominent place on the Town Hall. During the war period there had been no more loyal citizens than the Chinese, who had never turned down a request for assistance.

They had gone to a great deal of trouble to prepare a suitable display on Peace Day, and the result of their effort would be seen in the procession during in the celebrations. The Chinese felt that it was an honour to live under a flag which stood for the freedom of all peoples. The Mayor, in accepting the flag - a handsome silk one - on behalf of the citizens, warmly thanked the Chinese for their generosity, stating that the assistance given by the Chinese during the late war, both on the field of battle and in a monetary way, was fully recognised.

Boys' crime spree

Two boys who were recently placed by the court under the care of the Rev. E. A. Axelsen broke away on Saturday morning from the home in which they had been placed, and set off in search of adventure. Having made their way to Green Island they broke into Ramsay's store there, and appropriated a suitable supply of such prime necessaries of life as tobacco, cigarettes, and lollies.

A horse and cart, whose owner was transacting lengthy business in an adjacent hotel, seemed a useful gift to them, so they jumped in and drove as far as Henley. On the way opportunity presented itself to them again in the shape of a couple of ferrets, so they promptly ''seized the present opportunity,'' and sold the ferrets to defray travelling expenses.

They got as far as Milton when the local constable shattered their romance. At present they are in charge of Constable Fox, who will send them back to Dunedin this morning. The boys are only about 12 years old.

- ODT, 10.7.1919

COPIES OF PICTURE AVAILABLE FROM ODT FRONT OFFICE, LOWER STUART ST, OR WWW.OTAGOIMAGES.CO.NZ

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