Farmers buy lambs to fatten over winter

Buzz and Bridget Frame, of North Canterbury
Buzz and Bridget Frame, of North Canterbury
Gerard Scott and his son Conor Scott, of South Canterbury.
Gerard Scott and his son Conor Scott, of South Canterbury.
James Paterson and his daughter Grace (12), both of Gimmerburn.
James Paterson and his daughter Grace (12), both of Gimmerburn.
John Honeywell, of Mid Canterbury.
John Honeywell, of Mid Canterbury.
Mark Inder, of Ranfurly.
Mark Inder, of Ranfurly.
Matt Scott and his daughter Pippa (1), both of Kyeburn.
Matt Scott and his daughter Pippa (1), both of Kyeburn.
Scott Weir, of Waipiata
Scott Weir, of Waipiata
A pen of sheep at the Maniototo Early Muster Lamb Sale at Waipiata Saleyards.
A pen of sheep at the Maniototo Early Muster Lamb Sale at Waipiata Saleyards.
The Wade family (from left) Hamish and Katy and their sons Michael (2) and Richard (7) hosted an...
The Wade family (from left) Hamish and Katy and their sons Michael (2) and Richard (7) hosted an annual lamb sale on the farm block they manage in Kyeburn last week. PHOTOS: SHAWN MCAVINUE

Prices were up at an annual on-farm lamb sale near Kyeburn last week.

DJ Andrew & Co held its 10th annual lamb sale on its block between Kyeburn and Kokonga on State Highway 87.

The company runs deer, sheep and beef over about 4500ha across five blocks in the district.

Hamish Wade manages the about 400ha block where the annual lamb sale was held.

About 6000 halfbred wether and ewe store lambs and blackface terminal lambs were on offer.

A pen of 100 lambs failed to reach reserve, but the rest fetched an average price of $130, up $18 on last year.

"The owners were happy," Mr Wade said.

Carrfields agent Tony Arscott said his phone had been ringing hot with farmers wanting to get rid of lambs, especially in parts of Southland, because of dry weather and a lack of space at the meatworks.

Due to the lack of space, farmers were buying lambs to fatten over winter to send away in spring.

At the sale, farmers from Gore were buying halfbred lambs to fatten on the hills in winter "because there is a margin in them to carry them through" to send away.

Canterbury cropping farmers were buying halfbred lambs "because they need their grass seed paddocks eaten right up to the end of October" to improve the next crop.

 

 

 

SHAWN.MCAVINUE@alliedpress.co.nz

 

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