Aussie summers longer, winters shorter

Bondi Beach in Sydney. Photo: Getty
Bondi Beach in Sydney. Photo: Getty
Australian summers are getting longer and winters shorter, analysis of weather data shows.

The Australia Institute has studied two decades worth of Bureau of Meteorology data for the nation's cities, comparing it to a benchmark from the mid-twentieth century.

The think-tank is calling on the federal government to boost its emissions reduction plan to prevent more climate change related warming.

The study found that summer temperatures are continuing for 31 days longer than the benchmark, while winters are 23 days shorter.

Australia Institute's climate and energy director Richie Merzian says having more extreme heat events puts the public at risk and hurts the economy.

"The Australian government's current emission reduction targets are aligned with three to four degrees of warming," he said.

"Which leaves young Australians having ever-lengthening summers with significant consequences."

The federal government has committed to the Paris agreement, which aims for a 26 to 28 per cent reduction on 2005 greenhouse gas emissions levels by 2030.

The agreement also includes a pact to achieve net zero emissions in the second half of the century.

Labor has committed to net zero emissions by 2050, but hasn't revealed if its 2030 goal would be more ambitious than what the Paris target stipulates.

 

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