Spoiled ballot? PM shares young fan's attempt to swing election

Ardern shared her young fan's vote on social media. Photo: Supplied
Ardern shared her young fan's vote on social media. Photo: Supplied
Despite recent attempts to change it, our voting age remains at 18 - but that hasn't stopped one 6-year-old trying to cast a vote.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has shared the adorable attempt of her young fan on Facebook, a voting paper complete with drawings of the candidates.

"I love this," Ardern wrote. "Got a letter from a 6-year-old who was so upset to learn they couldn't vote, that they created their own ballot paper. Bless!"

The PM added: "If you haven't voted yet make sure you do, because there's a 6-year-old out there who would love the same privilege."

The ballot revealed that the youngster had placed their vote for a colourful Ardern, complete with red top, brown locks and lipstick and eschewed from choosing her equally technicolour rivals.

Supporters online were quick to praise the youngster for their attempt, with one saying that "more of our tamariki need to learn about politics".

Another shared that they were raising another young Labour fan: "My 8y/o son is obsessed with you and said really loudly in the voting area 'PUT THAT TICK ON JACINDA! TIIIICKKK ITTT!' Gave the ladies behind the desk a good laugh."

Meanwhile, it's been far from child's play for the PM and National leader Judith Collins on the campaign trail this week.

The adorable ballot paper shared by the PM. Photo: Supplied
The adorable ballot paper shared by the PM. Photo: Supplied
The leaders have fired verbal barbs at each other, with Ardern calling Collins "morally wrong" on climate change, "desperate" with her ongoing claims about the Greens' wealth tax, and "simplistic" in her comments about personal responsibility and obesity.

For her part, Collins told media that Ardern had lied over the testing of border-facing workers and she hoped the Labour leader would sue her because she was "happy to prove it".

And Collins continued to raise the scenario of Labour folding to the Greens and adopting their wealth tax in post-election negotiations.

Ardern has repeatedly dismissed this as "fiction" and "misinformation", and she did so again yesterday.

"I have said the same thing on this policy no less than probably 50 times. I have ruled it out," Arden said.

"What you're seeing from the National Party, frankly, is desperate."

Ardern also responded to Collins' suggestion that the Labour leader was subservient to the Greens when it came to coalition talks.

"I'm not someone who takes chocolate biscuits to the bargaining table to show subservience," Collins said.

Ardern: "I brought ginger loaf [in 2017 talks]. And that's just good baking."

David Seymour, Judith Collins, Jacinda Arderm, James Shaw and Marama Davidson. Photo: Supplied
David Seymour, Judith Collins, Jacinda Arderm, James Shaw and Marama Davidson. Photo: Supplied

 

 

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