Magazine

What we value

What we value

In the column two weeks ago we looked at what values are, where they come from and what life might be like if we live our lives based on them.

Time to reflect

Time to reflect

In 2011, American artist Nina Katchadourian spent 18 hours on a flight from New York to New Zealand, the longest flight of her life, to spend six weeks in Dunedin as part of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery's Visiting Artist Programme.

Iconoclasts

Iconoclasts

Work in the Dunedin School of Art's annual ''Site'' exhibition asks some searching questions, Bruce Munro writes.

Hayfever not to be sneezed at

Hayfever not to be sneezed at

Hayfever season is upon us but there are solutions, write Connie Katelaris and Janet Davies.

Pollution and hot air

Pollution and hot air

It has been a momentous week for the future of the planet. At last week's G20 summit, China and the US pledged to reduce the rate at which they put carbon into the atmosphere.

Busy night at Taste Merchants

Busy night at Taste Merchants

Tonight, five Dunedin artists converge on Taste Merchants to celebrate the debut releases of singer-songwriters Ciaran McMeeken and Some Other Creature.

The secret is out

The secret is out

An Arts Foundation award will help songwriter Dudley Benson realise his ambition of recording with the Southern Sinfonia. It's nice to get some recognition, too, the former choirboy tells Shane Gilchrist.

Risotto and rock 'n' roll

Risotto and rock 'n' roll

Next big thing Broods played Dunedin Town Hall last week. The following day, their photograph was in the paper again. Otago Daily Times music columnist and musician Sam Valentine reports on how the other band experienced the show, the support band, his band, Males.

Back on the tables, screaming

Back on the tables, screaming

Jimmy Barnes' latest album, 30:30 Hindsight, might offer a retrospective glimpse at an enduring career, yet the Australian rocker prefers to look to the future, writes Shane Gilchrist.

Solid as a block

Solid as a block

Farley's Buildings are among the oldest commercial buildings surviving in Dunedin, and though few might think it from their modest and scruffy appearance, they are rich in social, cultural, economic, religious, and even political history.

Sun rising on solar

Sun rising on solar

The sun looks set to shine on solar power as batteries come on line.

Pulling the plug

Pulling the plug

Meetings with prize-winning authors form the basis for a satire by a Kiwi expatriate, writes Stephen Jewell from London.

Men of conscience

Men of conscience

Dunedin is likely to set up New Zealand's first conscientious objector memorial. It would have been unimaginable during World War 1, when ''conchies'' were widely vilified as shirkers and traitors. Bruce Munro asks, how should we now view those who fought for peace by refusing to take up arms?

Taming the 'fashion monster'

Taming the 'fashion monster'

A Dunedin designer is finding solutions for the footprint left behind by fashion, Kim Dungey writes.

Water colours

Water colours

A boat trip in Doubtful Sound was a great day for artist Pauline Bellamy, and an enduring inspiration.

Rare in all its forms

Rare in all its forms

Rare in the wild, takahe are also seldom seen in museum collections, writes Ellen Sima.

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