Charity shop takes action to deter dumping

A Dunedin charity shop has had to install security cameras in an attempt to reduce the amount of rubbish being left at its doors after hours.

Despite signs clearly stating no donations are to be left on the footpath of ReStore after hours, people have still regularly been leaving things, much of it rubbish, assistant manager Lyle Palmer said.

Old televisions, broken electrical equipment, dirty linen, clothes and mattresses were being left at the store but were ''only fit for tipping''.

Since cameras were installed late last year, the number of after-hours visits had slowed but people were still doing it and licence numbers were being recorded.

Mr Palmer said they had not followed up on any after-hours dumping yet but they were keeping an eye on several people, including a small truck with its business name sign written on it.

''It took a little while [for dumping to reduce], but then word got around there were security cameras.''

He said they had become extra vigilant after someone set fire to rubbish in a skip next door.

He said ReStore also received a large number of donations that were ''very saleable and are much appreciated''.

Other charity store operators, including the Salvation Army and Presbyterian Support have also told The Star they have been inundated with illegally dumped items.

Dunedin City Council solid waste manager Ian Featherston said dropping material off outside shops after hours was illegal and people could be fined.

The Litter Act states that people can be fined up to $5000 for littering and businesses can be fined up to $20,000.

 

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