Wild Ways

A bird brought back from the dead

A bird brought back from the dead

In 1914, the subfossil skull of a takahe turned up at the Otago Museum. It had been dug up that year at Waitati along with kiwi and moa bones, evidence that these large flightless birds once inhabited the coastal forests and shrublands of the Dunedin region.

Sanctuary robins are thriving

Sanctuary robins are thriving

The South Island robin population at Orokonui Ecosanctuary has exploded, going from 17 just three years ago to about 235 today. Fiona Gordon reports.

Song to start the day

Song to start the day

It is 4.45am at Orokonui Ecosanctuary and still dark. Cars approaching along Blueskin Rd form a stream of lights. So much traffic at this hour of the morning? Yes, everyone wants to be here for this special event for our volunteers.

Hunting the saddleback

Hunting  the saddleback

Orokonui Ecosanctuary's conservation manager, Elton Smith, recently oversaw the transfer of 50 South Island saddlebacks, a threatened species, from an island in deepest, darkest Fiordland.

Superstar lizards coming to stay

Superstar lizards coming to stay

Orokonui Ecosanctuary is preparing to receive a spectacular new species, as Neville Peat reports.

Cedars of the mist

Cedars of the mist

Mountain cedars are one of the special assets of Orokonui Ecosanctuary. They tell their own stories, with help from Peter Johnson.

The very rarest of rare birds

The very rarest of rare birds

Sirocco is coming back to Orokonui to get you hooked on kakapo conservation, writes Karin Ludwig.

Takahe together at last

Takahe together at last

Two large flightless birds, ambassadors for an endangered species, are winning hearts and minds at Orokonui Ecosanctuary, as Neville Peat reports.

Elusive creatures of the streams

Elusive creatures of the streams

Orokonui Stream boasts a treasure trove of mysterious and elusive native freshwater species that have previously evaded the public eye, as Lan Pham reports. Tragically, most of them are disappearing from waterways throughout the country.

Robins just flitting along nicely

Robins just flitting along nicely

There are South Island robins in Orokonui Ecosanctuary - scores of them, writes Robert Schadewinkel.

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