Wild Ways

Bird feeders were never like this

Bird feeders were never like this

Many people put food out for the birds in winter. But at Orokonui Ecosanctuary supplementary feeding is a more complex affair.

A great leap forward

A great leap forward

Before endangered species can be moved to a safe haven such as Orokonui Ecosanctuary, some serious science has to be carried out. Zoology student Luke Easton is involved in a project assessing the feasibility of moving Hochstetter's frogs to Orokonui.

A fine feathered friend

A fine feathered friend

Sue Hensley tells the story of an Orokonui favourite , the kaka known as Mr Roto, who sadly died in an accident in late 2014.

Vegetation succession in action

Vegetation succession in action

Orokonui trustee Kelvin Lloyd reports on regeneration at the ecosanctuary.

Establishing a native forest

Establishing a native forest

People cutting down trees, people planting trees, all in the name of conservation. Matt Thomson and Alyth Grant report on work happening in Orokonui Ecosanctuary. 

Saddling up to farm the birds

Saddling up to farm the birds

Saddleback farming is going on at Orokonui Ecosanctuary, as conservation manager Elton Smith reports.

Making a difference

Making a difference

Tahu Mackenzie reports on an exciting new development in her work at Orokonui Ecosanctuary.

Dressing the guardians at Orokonui

Dressing the guardians at Orokonui

Alyth Grant reports on the growth and care of the flax grove near the entrance to Orokonui Ecosanctuary.

A bird brought back from the dead

A bird brought back from the dead

In 1914, the subfossil skull of a takahe turned up at the Otago Museum. It had been dug up that year at Waitati along with kiwi and moa bones, evidence that these large flightless birds once inhabited the coastal forests and shrublands of the Dunedin region.

Sanctuary robins are thriving

Sanctuary robins are thriving

The South Island robin population at Orokonui Ecosanctuary has exploded, going from 17 just three years ago to about 235 today. Fiona Gordon reports.

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