Budget 2022: What you need to know

Photo: RNZ
Photo: RNZ
There's a lot of spending flying around in Budget 2022 - here are the main expenses in an easy-to-read list.

Cost of living: $1b package

 - $814m for a $350 per person cost-of-living payment for individuals earning under $70k, equating to $27 a week per person over three months from 1 August for about 2.1m people,
 - Funding to continue half-price public transport fares for further two months, plus ongoing concession for Community Services cardholders,
 - $235m to continue fuel excise and road user charge reductions for a further two months
 - $73m for 26,500 more insulation and heating retrofits for low-income homeowners
 - Urgent supermarket legislation to ban covenants over land as a barrier to supermarkets accessing new sites and restricting competition
 - Child support payments passed to sole-parent beneficiaries as income instead of being retained by government

Health: $11.1 billion across the forecast period

 - $1.3b for health capital investments, including $572m for Whangarei Hospital, a further $78.3m for Hillmorton mental health project in Canterbury, and initial redevelopment planning for Nelson Hospital
 - Record ongoing annual funding boost for Health NZ: $1.8b in year one, plus $1.3 billion in year two
 - $488m for strengthening primary and community care
 - $299m for Maori health services
 - Remediation of DHB deficits (planned at $550m in '21/'22
 - Pharmac to get extra $191 million over the next two years
 - Three alcohol and drug treatment courts made permanent
 - $166.1m over four years for ambulance services including adding 48 ambulances and 13 other vehicles, 248 paramedics and frontline staff, and 22 call centre staff
 - $90.7m over four years for air ambulance services
 - $102m boost for community healthcare
 - $86m for GPs in high-needs areas
 - $76m for training and primary care specialists
 - $39 million over four years for Hauora Maori workforce development
 - Already announced $100m for mental health, and $90m for rolling out in-school Mana Ake mental health and wellbeing programme
 - $220m operating and $100m capital for investments in data and digital infrastructure for the reforms and health systems
 - Dental needs grants increased from $300 to $1000
 - Piki programme for free therapy in Wellington region extended

Climate

 - Emissions Reduction Plan spends $2.9b from Emergency Response Fund
 - $16m over four years for community-based renewable energy projects from the Maori and Public Housing Renewable Energy Fund
 - $31m for a Maori climate action platform

Education: $2b operating, $855m capital funding

 - $293m operating and $8m capital funding for replacing the decile system with the new Equity Index
 - $184m increase in school operating grants
 - $777m in capital investment including $219m for replacing furniture and equipment, $385m for building and refurbishing 280 classrooms at more than 40 schools, $88m for the Christchurch School Rebuild, $105m for Maori-medium kura
 - $270m operating and $5m capital funding for pay parity for education and care, and kindergarten teachers
 - Already announced $230m boost for apprenticeships, and support for Mana in Mahi and Maori Trades and Training Fund

Justice cluster*: $2.7b total operating, $65m capital funding

 - $190m to strengthen legal aid scheme
 - Already announced funding to maintain police officer-to-population ratio
 - $92m operating, $2m capital funding for serious and organised crime harm minimisation strategy
 - $165m operating, $21m capital funding for Tactical Response
 - $47m for Te Ao Marama District Court model
 - $34m operating, $13m capital funding for 15 March firearms commitments
 - $28m operating, $2m capital for supporting bereaved families and whanau in the coronial system
 - $141m for democratic processes including Electoral Commission funding for elections
 - $4m to strengthen the Independent Police Conduct Authority
 - Already announced $115m operating funding for family and sexual violence prevention
 * This now includes Ministry of Justice, New Zealand Police, the Department of Corrections, the Serious Fraud Office, Crown Law Office

Natural Resources cluster: $1b operating, $12m capital funding **

 - $179m total operating funding for Department of Conservation
 - $32m operating, $2m capital funding for animal health and welfare regulation
 - $92m operating, $2m capital for Biodiversity Strategy
 - $19m incentives for biodiversity support by private landowners
 - $179m for resource management reforms
 - $118m operating, $5m capital funding for advisory services on rural land use
 ** Includes Ministry for the Environment, Department of Conservation, Ministry for Primary Industries

Maori and Pacific: $580m package across health, social and justice sectors

 - $25m for Maori cadetships
 - $18m for Pacific STEAM futures
 - $8m for Tupu Aotearoa employment and training services
 - $10m for Te Ringa Hapai Whenua Infrastructure Fund
 - $26m for Progressive Procurement for Maori businesses
 - $40m for Maori media
 - $28m for protecting appropriate use of matauranga Maori and other taonga
 - $167m for Whanau Ora Commissioning Agencies
 - $168m for Hauora Maori (Maori Health Authority) Commissioning of health services
 - $16m to expand the Maori and Public Housing Renewable Energy Fund

Disability support: $934m for disability system transformation

 - $735m for disability service sustainability, with additional demand expected
 - $100m for rolling out Enabling Good Lives approach allowing service users to budget their own services
 - $108m to establish the new Ministry for Disabled People and support operations

Housing

 - $221m for Affordable Housing Fund
 - $1b to support public and transitional housing
 - $355m for redesigning emergency housing system
 - $75m for Homelessness Action Plan

Covid-19

 - Budget 2022 sets aside $1.2b for immediate Covid-related public health needs
 - $58.4b of the $61.6b Covid-19 Response and Recovery Fund (CRRF) has been allocated, leaving $3.2b. The CRRF will be closed and remaining funding repurposed, with $1.2 for urgent public health needs and $1b for cost of living relief

Broadcasting, arts and culture

 - $370m over four years operating, $306m capital funding for the new Public Media Entity
 - Funding for NZSO, Royal NZ Ballet, Heritage NZ, Te Papa, Nga Taonga Sound and Vision, Matariki celebrations, museums, Waitangi National Trust Board

Business and industry

 - $100m for a Business Growth Fund for SMEs
 - Continuation of the $200m Regional Strategic Partnership Fund
 - $60 to progress Income Insurance Scheme design
Industry Transformation plans:

 - $37m for Construction Sector Accord Transformation plan
 - $30m for Advanced Manufacturing Industry Transformation plan
 - $5m for Agritech Industry Transformation plan
 - $20m for Digital Technologies Transformation plan
 - $40m for Primary Industry Transformation plan

Other

 - Further funding to progress Auckland Light Rail
 - $349m for rail networks and rolling stock
 - $10.9b over five years contribution to the NZ Superannuation Fund, greater than required
 - $60m to improve broadband infrastructure in worst-served regions
 - $30m for Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) cybersecurity agency
 - New parliamentary accommodation
 - Air New Zealand's recapitalisation plan to maintain the Government's 51% shareholding
 - Replacement facility for Te Papa spirit collection
 - Purpose-built facility for Whangarei Airport's Rescue and Firefighting Service
 - Funding for Chatham Islands exports and imports vessel Southern Tiare
 - Upgrading courts' case management system
 - Upgrading satellite GPS accuracy

Totals and fiscal balancing

 - $61.9b total for infrastructure upgrades 2022-'26
 - $6.156b in new operating spending from Budget 2022 over five years, coming to $5.9b net
 - $30.609b total operating expenditure for 2022-24

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