Man charged with historical abuse at Dilworth School dies

Police announced the arrests today. Photo / Getty Images
The Dilworth School. Photo: Getty Images
One of the men charged after a police investigation into alleged historical sexual offending at Dilworth School has died.

The man - who still has name suppression - died yesterday.

He had been earlier diagnosed with cancer.

A single charge against the man alleged that between the start of 1975 and the end of 1976 he had indecently assaulted a boy in Auckland.

In mid-September, Detective Senior Sergeant Geoff Baber announced seven men had been charged after an investigation dubbed Operation Beverly that focused on allegations of historical abuse at the school.

Dilworth School was opened in 1906 with the aim of helping boys from disadvantaged families.

However, police alleged a number of serious offences occurred in four different decades, spanning from the 1970s to the 2000s.

Six of the men - including the deceased - denied the allegations against them.

However, one man - former assistant principal Ian Wilson - was convicted after pleading guilty to two charges involving indecent acts.

He will be sentenced next year.

Where to get help:

• If it's an emergency and you feel that you or someone else is at risk, call 111.
• If you've ever experienced sexual assault or abuse and need to talk to someone call the confidential crisis helpline Safe to Talk on: 0800 044 334 or text 4334. (available 24/7)
• Male Survivors Aotearoa offers a range of confidential support at centres across New Zealand - find your closest one here.
• Mosaic - Tiaki Tangata: 0800 94 22 94 (available 11am - 8pm)
• Alternatively contact your local police station
• If you have been abused, remember it's not your fault.

 

 

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