Moo Juice: Non-homogenised milk, glass bottles gain popularity

John Marshall and Anna Emmerson and their children Max, 4, and Georgie, 6, with their "Moo Juice"...
John Marshall and Anna Emmerson and their children Max, 4, and Georgie, 6, with their "Moo Juice". Photo: Supplied
Love it or hate it, thick creamy whole milk is continuing its resurgence.

Those who enjoy drinking their milk with cream on top in a glass bottle are having more options to choose from - as farmers adapt their businesses to match the trends.

Many across the nation are jumping on the non-homogenised milk bandwagon while demand for milk in reusable glass bottles grows.

Up north, the Herald has reported in its 12 weeks of operating, Kaipaki Dairies has saved 700,000 plastic milk bottles from being produced.

The business has taken it a step further, with owners John Heskett and Riley Chick distributing a milk tap system for receiving non-homogenised milk without creating any waste.

Other farms such as Canterbury-based Roan Farm began selling A2 milk in reusable glass bottles last year.

The trend has also taken off on the West Coast, after long-time farmers Anna Emmerson and John Marshall were regularly hearing complaints of "I hate supermarket milk and all that horrible stuff in plastic."

Long-time farmers Anna Emmerson and John Marshall out on the farm with their two children Georgie...
Long-time farmers Anna Emmerson and John Marshall out on the farm with their two children Georgie, 6, and Max, 4. Photo: Supplied
They'd been working on the outskirts of Moana for seven years supplying Westland Milk Products, when they decided to branch out to give the public what they wanted.

Over the wintertime, on top of their usual work - the couple formed boutique dairy business Your Farm - just for West Coasters to enjoy.

Keeping it real with "none of that fancy homogenised and standardised city stuff" - the couple have no intentions to sell their lightly pasteurised milk anywhere other than within the region.

"It is just about looking after the Coasters close by that want to appreciate it," Emmerson said.

Five months on since the birth of their creamy pasteurised milk - demand has risen with their quirky labels "Moo Juice" and "No Bull" turning heads.

"It's just about having a bit of fun with our bottles and people having real food that hasn't been processed terribly much," Emmerson said.

Demand for the milk has been growing steadily over the last six months, to about 2000 litres a week.

Currently 30 out of its 180 cows are used especially for the new business- while the rest supply to Westland Milk.

West Coast farmers John Marshall and Anna Emmerson formed boutique dairy business Your Farm over...
West Coast farmers John Marshall and Anna Emmerson formed boutique dairy business Your Farm over the winter-time. Photo: Supplied
With the region left to pick up the pieces following the economic fallout sparked by Covid-19, job creation is remaining at the forefront of the two farmers' minds.

Infometrics' latest provisional GDP estimated the West Coast was one of the hardest-hit regions from the recent lockdowns.

Economic activity in the region grew by 1.7 per cent over the year, trailing behind the national average of 3.7 per cent.

But Emmerson said since the birth of Your Farm, they have hired one full-time worker and two part-timers on the books.

"We want to employ more people and have it so more people want to come work here because they like something a little bit different and unique," she said.

They're hoping beef, chicken and eggs will be added to the business down the track with their chickens already producing "astounding" eggs with "bright orange" yolks that can't be found on the supermarket shelves, Emmerson said.

"It's just about having real food that comes straight out of the farm for locals rather than not knowing where your food has come from".

The return of whole milk has gripped the media spotlight overseas.

An article in New York magazine Grub Street titled "Whole Milk Mounts its Triumphant Comeback: Hot girls are ditching the alternatives and are going back to basics," sparked debate around the globe.

Emmerson believes the reason is that whole milk is good fat and "everyone is sick of the plastic bottle".

"There are a few (boutique farms) around the country but it is the same old thing where you have to be a niche in a certain area because if you had another person set up here it wouldn't work."

- By Georgia O'Connor-Harding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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