Thousands of potholes fixed, roads sealed, big projects finished

The Selwyn Sports Centre was completed in April. 84,000 people visited the complex in the first...
The Selwyn Sports Centre was completed in April. 84,000 people visited the complex in the first two months. Photo: Supplied
Almost 4000 potholes were fixed on roads across the Selwyn district in the last financial year.

Sam Broughton.
Sam Broughton.
Selwyn District Council also says it resealed 44km of roads, completed 9087km of grading on unsealed roads, and 3.2km of footpath extensions.

The facts and figures feature in the district council’s summary of work during 2021, and in the 2020/2021 financial year to June 30.

Roading projects in the financial year also included the continued construction of two major new roundabouts - at the Springs Rd/Marshs Rd and Shands Rd/Blakes Rd intersections - to be completed in November.

Mayor Sam Broughton said 2021 had been a year of major milestones, including completing big community infrastructure projects, which had come to fruition after years of careful planning and hard work.

"All of these support the amazing community we have here in Selwyn.

"We will continue to work hard to address the challenges, and make the most of the opportunities, growth brings.

"Our community has made us the most popular place for Kiwis to come and live."

The district council summary included projects for the financial year as well as the calendar year, following the release of its annual report being delayed to the end of the year due to disruptions related to Covid restrictions.

Visit selwyn.govt.nz/annualreport for the full annual report.

Almost 4000 potholes were repaired on Selwyn roads in the last financial year. Photo: Supplied
Almost 4000 potholes were repaired on Selwyn roads in the last financial year. Photo: Supplied
Highlights:

  • Population growth outstripped the rest of the country. Statistics New Zealand estimates for the financial year showed Selwyn had the largest total growth, of 3400 people, as well as the largest percentage growth, of 4.8 per cent.
  • Residential building consents set new records, with 2916 building consents issued altogether, up 11.2 per cent on the previous year.
  • The $21.5 million Selwyn Sports Centre was completed in April. It saw 84,000 visits in its first two months.
  • The $14.7 million Selwyn Health Hub was completed in April. Pacific Radiology is a tenant and the health board will soon move its maternity services in.
  • Library use continued to grow, there were 437,835 visits to district council pools (equivalent to six swims for each Selwyn resident), and 23,713 people flocked to district council community events despite the pandemic.
  • A new 10-lane, 25m pool, opened at the Selwyn Aquatic Centre in June, more than doubling lane capacity.
  • The $22.2 million Te Ara Ātea cultural facility and sensory space of the Rolleston town centre were completed by the end of the calendar year.
  •  Selwyn continued to be one of the strongest economies nationwide, with GDP for the district growing by seven per cent in comparison to a national average of 4.2 per cent in the financial year.
  • The strong growth contributed to district council revenue of $171.2 million, compared to the expected budget of $158.6 million.
  • The district council had a surplus of $52.4 million in the financial year. This is a decrease of $26.7 million on the previous year, mostly due to lower levels of assets being vested to the district council by developers.
  • Total expenditure was $120.6 million, compared with budgeted expenditure of $120.8 million.
  • More than $15 million worth of improvements to drinking water, stormwater and wastewater systems were completed, while a further 6ha of reserves were added to the district’s network of parks. 

Completion of the Darfield/Kirwee pipeline to the Pines Wastewater Treatment Plant is scheduled...
Completion of the Darfield/Kirwee pipeline to the Pines Wastewater Treatment Plant is scheduled for this year. Photo: Supplied
Upcoming district council project highlights for 2022 include:

  • Work to continue on the new $13 million, 22ha, Springs Park sports and nature reserve at Prebbleton, as well as upgrades to Kirwee Reserve and the Darfield Domain.
  • Building of $4.2 million artificial football and hockey turfs, alongside a 200-vehicle park to replace the existing gravel car park, at Foster Park.
  • Completion of the Darfield/Kirwee pipeline to the Pines Wastewater Treatment Plant, which has $10.66 million shovel ready funding. A new sewer line along the Darfield main street will pave the way for businesses and new developments to connect up.
  • Water capacity upgrades will begin for Darfield, Leeston, Prebbleton, Rolleston, West Melton and the rural restricted supplies. There will also be water storage and quality upgrades at Springfield and Castle Hill.
  • Repairs to Darfield Pool, $1.5 million is budgeted for the 2021/2022 financial year.
  • Continuing work around the Rolleston town square and reserve developments, and town centre including a Rolleston Drive/Tennyson St intersection upgrade and Rolleston Drive roading upgrade. It will be as the $85 million Rolleston Fields private enterprise shopping centre buildings come under construction.
  • Building of a new Leeston Medical Centre to replace the existing earthquake prone facility, with potential to extend or add complementary services. Cost is $1.86 million funded by lease rental income.
  • Roading network programme safety improvements of $17.8 million over 2022-2030, funded by Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, development contributions and the general rate.
  • Prebbleton arterial intersection upgrades to begin – Shands/Trents, Shands/Hamptons Rds and Springs/Hamptons Rds. There has been $13.8 million allocated through to 2025, funded by Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, development contributions and the general rate.

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