A&P show enjoyed despite shower

Stacey and Sienna, 2,  Pennell ride the mini jeeps. PHOTOS: WYATT RYDER
Stacey and Sienna, 2, Pennell ride the mini jeeps. PHOTOS: WYATT RYDER
Elderflower Maguire, 3, of Palmerston, rides a pony for the first time at the Palmerston A&P Show.
Elderflower Maguire, 3, of Palmerston, rides a pony for the first time at the Palmerston A&P Show.
Charlie Downes, 6, of Palmerston, rides the spinning zebras.
Charlie Downes, 6, of Palmerston, rides the spinning zebras.
Noel Sheat, of Palmerston, sits on his 1934 Case Model L.
Noel Sheat, of Palmerston, sits on his 1934 Case Model L.
Axel McLeod, 10, spins cotton candy for sweet-toothed customers.
Axel McLeod, 10, spins cotton candy for sweet-toothed customers.
Lucy Wells, 5, of Palmerston, pets a preoccupied goat.
Lucy Wells, 5, of Palmerston, pets a preoccupied goat.
Anita Vickers does a shearing demonstration at the Palmerston A&P Show.
Anita Vickers does a shearing demonstration at the Palmerston A&P Show.

Despite rocky weather and a cancelled talent show, the Palmerston and Waihemo A&P Show pulled through as a great success, organisers say.

About 400 people attended the A&P showgrounds on Saturday for a day of fun, food and the rural lifestyle.

The show was busy throughout the morning, but a heavy shower sent many home at noon.

Later, the clouds parted and the wind died down to make the perfect setting for the grand parade, show president Cody Jenkins said.

"I think I might have got sunburnt."

The new lifestyle section had proved to be a success, but what was supposed to be the inaugural talent show was cancelled due to a dearth of entries.

About 20 people signed up, but many pulled out or had not followed through, he said.

There was a good range of entertainment and the feedback had been very positive, he said.

Noel Sheat brought a range of vintage tractors to show off with the East Otago Vintage Machinery Club.

One of the vehicles was his 1934 Case Model L, which only had about 20 years’ use as a piece of farm machinery before becoming a collector’s item.

He was under no delusions that a modern tractor with a big cab would get the job done better than the Model L, but it shared a few similar features.

His cabless tractor also cost a lot of money and had air conditioning, but its temperature depended on the weather each day.

Mr Sheat would not divulge how many vintage tractors he owned, as his wife read the newspaper.

Anita Vickers was there giving sheep shearing demonstrations for the lifestyle section, clipping each fleece within a few minutes.

She said she wanted to deliver a speech about the essentials of sheep shearing, such as when to feed them beforehand, but there was not a big enough crowd early in the morning.

She had to pack up about 10.30am, as she was scheduled to play squash in the Masters Games later that day.

wyatt.ryder@odt.co.nz

 

 

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