Council seeks feedback on district's Vision 2050

Housing, transport, active travel, cultural and economic diversity are just some of the other...
Housing, transport, active travel, cultural and economic diversity are just some of the other significant issues the vision addresses. Photo: ODT files
A clean, green, welcoming, creative, active, accessible and resilient place that embraces its Maori ancestry and European heritage and has a strong, diverse economy.

Jim Boult
Jim Boult

That, in something of a nutshell, is the possible desired future of Queenstown Lakes district, at present experiencing growing pains.

Mayor Jim Boult and the district council announced the Vision 2050 project in August. The initial consultation website was released on Thursday.

Rather than a dry, impenetrable but practical, district-plan type document expected from local government, it is a list of guiding principles on which future decisions could be based.

Public feedback drop-in sessions begin on Monday on the plan, titled A Unique Place. An Inspiring Future - He Wahi Tuhaha. He Amua Whakaohooho.

Mr Boult said: "We are about to undertake one of the most important conversations with the people and the communities of our district that will influence the lives of our children as they grow in the Lakes district.''

It presents eight key themes for how the district will move into the future 2050 and beyond, he said.

"This is a vision for our people, by our people and while we have called on a number of great thinkers and diverse stakeholders from across the district to drive that work, now we want to hear the voice of our wider communities.''

The district is struggling to manage growth and its effects, caused by a tourism and population boom.

"With unprecedented growth in our district, the time is right to ensure that growth is not at the expense of what we hold dear.

"I expect people may be challenged by these principles and outcomes, others may feel they want them to be bolder. I think they will instigate some strong debate. That is genuinely my hope.

"A desire for Queenstown Lakes residents to be able to awaken to a deafening dawn chorus is a great example that could have implications for many agencies, businesses, education and our ethnically diverse community. I find that both moving and powerful but others may have a different view.''

Housing, transport, active travel, cultural and economic diversity are just some of the other significant issues the vision addresses.

Mr Boult confirmed that with the guiding community-owned principles set through the Beyond 2050 vision work, the council will be developing other longer-term plans for the district.

This work will also sit alongside existing and evolving town-specific master plans and other local government planning documents.

Feedback can be given until January 25, 2019, and also at drop-in sessions, council offices and libraries.

 

Add a Comment

 

top_header.jpg

bottom_header.jpg

 

 

Advertisement

postanote_header_620_x_80.png

postanote_620_x_25.jpg