Emerging designers weave in family stories

Models show off the designs of Gisella Candi, of the University of Technology Sydney.PHOTO: LINDA...
Models show off the designs of Gisella Candi, of the University of Technology Sydney.PHOTO: LINDA ROBERTSON
Models wear designs from Sara Kickmayer, from Institut Francais de la Mode, in France.PHOTO:...
Models wear designs from Sara Kickmayer, from Institut Francais de la Mode, in France.PHOTO: SUPPLIED
Onlookers clap designs of this year’s iD International Emerging Designer Awards finalists. PHOTOS...
Onlookers clap designs of this year’s iD International Emerging Designer Awards finalists. PHOTOS: LINDA ROBERTSON
New Zealand’s Lydia Paine, of Massey University, was named Viva Best NZ Emerging Designer for her...
New Zealand’s Lydia Paine, of Massey University, was named Viva Best NZ Emerging Designer for her collection ‘‘Mother & Mode’’
The striking garments from designer Jing He, of Massey University, are showcased on the runway at...
The striking garments from designer Jing He, of Massey University, are showcased on the runway at Otago Museum on Saturday.
Models wear the designs of George Borrie, from the Southern Institute of Technology in...
Models wear the designs of George Borrie, from the Southern Institute of Technology in Invercargill, who used the style of his late brother to create his collection ‘‘Muse’’.

Among the frills and draping fabrics at this year’s iD International Emerging Designer Awards were family stories to be told.

The winners of this year’s awards were announced to a sellout crowd in Dunedin on Saturday.

First place was won by Sara Kickmayer from Institut Francais de la Mode, in France, for her collection "Real Utopia".

Among the section winners was New Zealand’s Lydia Paine, a graduate of Massey University.

She was named Viva Best NZ Emerging Designer for her collection "Mother & Mode", which she said was inspired by her ancestors’ crafts.

"My great-grandad was a cobbler so I experimented with smocked leather shoes.

"It was a discovery for me as I looked through images of my family and looked at the crafts that they did growing up.

"It really inspired me to bring back the value of that."

Paine said the award came as a major surprise.

"I literally didn’t even hear my name get called.

"I was so honoured, especially seeing all the incredible talent around me."

George Borrie
George Borrie
It was also a special evening for another New Zealand finalist, George Borrie, of the Southern Institute of Technology in Invercargill.

His collection "Muse" was inspired by his older brother who died 10 years after suffering from depression.

Borrie said he combined his brother’s love of plaid and flannel shirts, white T-shirts and jeans with his own love for tailoring.

"I decided to turn all of his flannel shirts into coats."

Seeing the garments on the runway for the world to see was a memorable moment, he said.

"I had family there — they shed a few tears."

Gisella Candi
Gisella Candi
Gisella Candi, from the University of Technology Sydney, was one of the few international finalists able to travel to attend physically.

She swept up the Bremworth Natural Luxury with Wool prize, making the trip well worth it.

"I’m so glad I came ... to put it lightly," Candi said.

Her collection "Wide Angle Smile" is 80% wool, used in an innovative, colourful, unexpected way.

The garments of 11 New Zealand finalists and five Australian finalists were showcased on a runway at the Otago Museum, followed by a premiere screening of 2021 iD International Emerging Designer Awards Film.

Second place was awarded to Min-Yan Tsai, from Shih Chien University in Taiwan, for "Flourish Tumulus", and third place went to "Put on-Take Off" by Mengzhe (Justin) Chi, from Fashion Institute of Technology, New York, in the United States.

iD Dunedin Most Sustainable Collection was awarded to Olivia Rubens, from London College of Fashion in Canada.

Head judge and designer Tanya Carlson said despite the challenges this year’s finalists had faced over the past 18 months, there was an overwhelming feeling of optimism in all the entries.

“It’s encouraging to see that the future of fashion is in good hands.

"There is an overarching move towards an intimate process of creativity and hand-making, with a number of students incorporating hand knitting in their collections."

iD Dunedin Fashion Inc. chairwoman and Otago Polytechnic fashion professor Dr Margo Barton thanked the global jury for their time and experience, as well as the hundreds of volunteer hours required to bring the show to the stage and celebrate the world’s emerging designers.

  • The 2021 film will play at the Otago Museum until Sunday, and will be on the iD website from today.

molly.houseman@odt.co.nz

Add a Comment

Our journalists are your neighbours

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Become a Supporter