On a quest to develop community market

Fairfield Community Market organiser Nicole Broekhuyse, of Saddle Hill, sells her handcrafted...
Fairfield Community Market organiser Nicole Broekhuyse, of Saddle Hill, sells her handcrafted greeting cards at the monthly market and wants more stallholders to attend the community event at Fairfield Community Hall.PHOTO: SHAWN MCAVINUE

Taieri Times is recognising people for the good they do in the community. In ‘‘Top Types’’ we are celebrating these people.

This week, Shawn McAvinue talks to Fairfield Community Market organiser Nicole Broekhuyse, of Saddle Hill.

Nicole Broekhuyse is on a mission to do good in her community.

Since taking on the duties of organising the Fairfield Community Market this year, she has been devising ways for people to benefit from the monthly event.

She wanted the market to continue as it gave people a place to sell locally-made products such as jewellery, jams, and her homemade cards.

"I like crafting. I like being around like-minded people and I like to give.''

When she took over the event, she changed its name from Fairfield Hall Craft Market.

The market name needed the word "community'' in it because its aim was to grow the community.

At the markets this year, as stallholders sold their wares in Fairfield Community Hall, three local scouts ran a sausage sizzle outside to raise funds for an upcoming jamboree.

If a group was fundraising it could run a stall for free.

She was trying to grow the market by lobbying stallholders at the Otago Farmers Market to come along.

Many people in her community struggled to get to central Dunedin for the farmers market, so the effort would be worth it, she said.

The market was a "relaxed'' environment, where stallholders had the time to talk to customers.

The hall had capacity for 33 stalls and was attracting between 20 and 30 stallholders.

A market stall cost $10, she said.

Any profit - after the hall hire cost was deducted - was returned to the community in goods such as new books or gift baskets as prizes in a free raffle for market patrons.

"I could keep the money - but it wouldn't feel right - especially when I know I can help people with it.''

The market runs between 10am and 1.30pm on the second Sunday of the month.

• If you know of anyone who you think is a "Taieri Top Type'', let us know at star@alliedpress.co.nz.

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