Dunedin takes out top two in Gold Guitars

Melissa Partridge of Dunedin
Melissa Partridge of Dunedin. Photos: Gregor Richardson
Kayla Wilcox from Invercargill
Kayla Wilcox from Invercargill
band Natani from Invercargill
The band Natani from Invercargill
Nick Bourke from Brydone
Nick Bourke from Brydone
Rach Mercer from Wallacetown
Rach Mercer from Wallacetown
Liv Cochrane from Invercargill
Liv Cochrane from Invercargill
Zayde Blair from Amberley
Zayde Blair from Amberley
Campbell Landrebe from Dunedin
Campbell Landrebe from Dunedin
band 50 Shades of Blonde from Dunedin
The band 50 Shades of Blonde from Dunedin
band Melissa and the Dr, from Dunedin
The band Melissa and the Dr, from Dunedin
The Trill from Invercargill
The Trill from Invercargill
Caleb Croy from Mosgiel
Caleb Croy from Mosgiel
Zac Griffith from Wakefield
Zac Griffith from Wakefield
Holly Muirhead from Invercargill
Holly Muirhead from Invercargill
Ngarangi Sadlier from Lower Hutt
Ngarangi Sadlier from Lower Hutt
Beka Clark from Timaru
Beka Clark from Timaru
Luke and William from Nelson
Luke and William from Nelson
Vocal Group category- Highway One
Vocal Group category- Highway One
Vocal Group category- Vino
Vocal Group category- Vino
Jenny Harraway from Gore
Jenny Harraway from Gore
Ronel Hunter from Kaka Point
Ronel Hunter from Kaka Point
Casey Dixon from Dunedin
Casey Dixon from Dunedin
Asra Ginders from Rangiora
Asra Ginders from Rangiora
band M.A.C. from Gore and Dunedin
band M.A.C. from Gore and Dunedin
Kayla Wilcox from Invercargill
Kayla Wilcox from Invercargill

Dunedin musician Melissa Partridge has won the top award at the Gold Guitar Awards in Gore.

Music fans flocked to hear 36 finalists compete in the Mataura Licensing Trust New Zealand Gold Guitar Awards senior finals last night with Partridge coming out on top.

Casey Dixon, also of Dunedin, was runner-up.

Event convener Philip Geary said the Gore event was "one of the best we’ve ever had."

"It’s the quality of the contestants, the judges and I would put it down to audience participation as well."

Overall, 755 musicians entered the competition.

While numbers in the senior and junior categories were around the same as usual, the intermediate section had flourished with 260 hopefuls taking part.

"The intermediates were 70 more than normal...by far the highest we’ve ever had."

The Gold Guitar intermediate winner, Wakefield’s Zac Griffith, and junior winner Sophie Toyne of Whanganui, were chosen on Saturday.

The senior winner’s prize included $3,000 cash, a new guitar, recording and video sessions to help launch their career.

"If you were to put a dollar value on it, it’s probably worth $12,000 or $13,000."

The event brought Gore’s first Tussock Country Music festival to a close.

The nine day festival had worked well with the Gold Guitar Awards, he said.

"It’s definitely a positive thing, its bringing more people to the town and more people are becoming aware of Gold Guitars."

People from all over the country took part, he said.

"We had a lot more north island entrants this year than we’ve ever had."

The annual event was held for the 47th time after taking a year out due to the Covid-19 pandemic, was held.

Musicians and music fans were looking for events closer to home.

"Whether we like it or not, Covid may have helped a little bit."

Tickets sold out on the very morning of the event, he said.

"We’ve had a full house...It’s great."

- By Fiona Ellis

 

Comments

(this comment has nothing to do with the winner whom I do not know or have heard of)

but country music in NZ will never return to its glory days or compete on the world stage until we get professional MUSIC judges.

Using former or retired singers is not the same as someone who is qualified musically and can put a winner to certainty into the future.

Too many clubs in NZ give awards to their mates and then you see on the show posters "Award winning artist".

Many NZ country artists put their recordings on the net and are judged by clicks of mouse buttons.

 

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