Tattoos commemorate family story

The artwork covering much of the top half of Chris Dick’s body is all about family.

He had a dragon, because he was born in the Chinese Year of the Dragon, and atiger, a monkey, and...
He had a dragon, because he was born in the Chinese Year of the Dragon, and atiger, a monkey, and a pig, which represented the Chinese years in which his three sons and his wife were born.
The Dunedin immigration adviser (44) has a vast array of interconnecting tattoos spanning both arms, his back, and his chest.

His tattoos represent his family and, with his wife being Vietnamese, the work had an oriental aspect to it.

"There’s a lot of Vietnamese, the Vietnamese flowers and things going on."

He had a dragon, because he was born in the Chinese Year of the Dragon, and a tiger, a monkey, and a pig, which represented the Chinese years in which his three sons and his wife were born.

On his back was a phoenix, which he liked because it fitted nicely with the other work.

He first got some tattoos done in his late teens, but, he pointed out, "they were a bit s...".

About 18 months ago, he decided it was the right time to get some new work that was more family oriented.

He got his left arm done first, but then decided the other arm also needed doing to balance it up.

"Then it was like ‘Well, you’ve got the arms done, you may as well get the chest done’.

"Then it’s like ‘Well, the back looks a bit empty. Where does it stop, I don’t know."

He gets his work done by Chris Downing, of Crazy Horse Tattoos.

Chris Dick receives a top-up tattoo from Chris Downing, of Crazy Horse Tattoos. PHOTOS: CHRISTINE...
Chris Dick receives a top-up tattoo from Chris Downing, of Crazy Horse Tattoos. PHOTOS: CHRISTINE O’CONNER

"Chris [Downing] does the style I like, he’s pretty much the only one that does the style I like. I love it. That’s why I keep coming back."

He thinks he has probably spent about 50 hours getting inked, including one marathon 11 hour session.

He got his left arm done first, but then decided the other arm also needed doing to balance it up. Photo: Christine O'Connor
He got his left arm done first, but then decided the other arm also needed doing to balance it up. Photo: Christine O'Connor

To cope with the pain, he repeats the mantra "the pain goes, the ink stays".

As for any future work, that is up in the air.

"Never say never."

His tattoos represent his family and, with his wife being Vietnamese, the work had an oriental aspect to it. Photo: Christine O'Connor
His tattoos represent his family and, with his wife being Vietnamese, the work had an oriental aspect to it. Photo: Christine O'Connor

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