First they put trees in, then take them out

Gamma St resident Rodney Bryant says it is unbelievable the Dunedin City Council would remove five young trees from the road only months after they planted them outside the Roslyn Bowling Club. Photo: Peter McIntosh
Gamma St resident Rodney Bryant says it is unbelievable the Dunedin City Council would remove five young trees from the road only months after they planted them outside the Roslyn Bowling Club. Photo: Peter McIntosh
The sudden disappearance of a row of young trees from a Dunedin street only a few months after they were planted has at least one resident perplexed.

Last week, five young cherry plum trees were removed from a grass berm in Gamma St, just outside the Roslyn bowling club.

The Dunedin City Council had planted the trees only about two months ago.

Gamma St resident Rodney Bryant said the trees' removal seemed very strange and there was no apparent reason for their removal.

One tree planted at the same time had been left in place, Mr Bryant said.

''They've actually turned a fairly simple exercise where they put six trees in, into one where they put six trees in then they take five out again.''

All that was left was an untidy mess where the trees were, he said.

Council parks and recreation group manager Robert West said letters had been sent to residents who had trees planted outside their houses but the bowling club had been missed out.

After the trees were planted the bowling club expressed concern about their location and the council decided to replant them in the Mornington Park.

Mr Bryant said he was unaware of any consultation and was unimpressed the concerns of the club had been given more weight than those of the residents in the street.

''The bowling club is only operation for four months of the year and they're not residents. I'm a resident here and the trees were presumably put in the street for residents to enjoy.

''I can't understand, first of all, if they think consultation is important why they didn't ask everyone before they put them in and if they haven't learnt their lesson, then why didn't they consult when they took them out?''

Roslyn Bowling Club secretary Isobel Sharp said the trees affected access for members and also made maintenance of the verge more difficult.

The club also eventually hoped the berm could be turned into angle-parking and had asked the council to consider the idea.

Despite not being consulted before the trees went in, the club felt the council had been very helpful once it was aware of the concerns, she said.

tim.miller@odt.co.nz

Comments

Good Old DCC planting cherry plum trees what happens when they fruit? this has been stopped overseas because dropped fruit attracts rats and vermin. The DCC can't keep the maintenance up of the verge, so what happens when when they fruit?

The residents harvest them.

Good grief. Look for problems where there are none.

Funny-sounding word, 'berm'. Verge seems to be falling from favour.

 

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