More monitoring of city slip site

A slip underneath this Allandale Rd property, is still moving and it is not yet known when the five other neighbouring properties, also considered dangerous buildings, can be occupied again. Photos: Peter McIntosh
A slip underneath this Allandale Rd property, is still moving and it is not yet known when the five other neighbouring properties, also considered dangerous buildings, can be occupied again. Photos: Peter McIntosh
An idea of what is causing a landslip in St Clair is becoming clearer but it is still not known when residents evacuated for almost eight weeks will be allowed to return home.

The six homes, four in Motu St and two in Allandale Rd, were evacuated in December after the slip was reported to the Earthquake Commission.

In a written statement, EQC head of response and recovery Robyn Nation said further monitoring of the slip was needed to determine the cause. This would be done during the next fortnight.

Last week engineers from Tonkin and Taylor met the properties' owners and staff from the Dunedin City Council to explain what was needed to resolve the situation so residents could better understand how their claims could be settled, Mrs Nation said.

Results of the earlier monitoring had shown there had been more minor movements of the slip and a better idea of what remedial options were available would be known once the survey was completed, she said.

Motu St.
Motu St.
The property owners would be updated again next, she said.

The owner of one of the Motu St properties, David Wooffindin, said he was pleased by the increase in communication from the council and EQC.

Residents had previously told the Otago Daily Times they were frustrated by the lack of information they were being given but Mr Wooffindin said that was no longer the case.

''I can see why it is taking so long and can see the complexities of it and the need for them to do what they are doing ... At least we know where we are going and have some sort of timeline,'' he said.

The tenant who had leased Mr Wooffindin's property has had to find other accommodation and the tenancy agreement had been terminated, meaning he was losing money while the property was empty.

Council building solutions manager Paul Henderson said it was the council's judgement the properties and surrounding land remained dangerous. Until that changed, residents would not be allowed to return.

When the properties were safe again would be determined by solutions being implemented and what engineers found during monitoring, he said.

Under the Building Act, the property owners can ask the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment for a determination if they felt the council's decision was wrong, he said.

None of the property owners had asked for a determination.

tim.miller@odt.co.nz

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