Embroiderers stitching NZ history together

Otago Embroiderers' Guild members Jan Letts (front left) and Jeanette Trotman continue work on a New Zealand historical tapestry project, with fellow members Barbara Smith (rear left) and Shirley Jaquiery, at the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum yesterday. Pho
Otago Embroiderers' Guild members Jan Letts (front left) and Jeanette Trotman continue work on a New Zealand historical tapestry project, with fellow members Barbara Smith (rear left) and Shirley Jaquiery, at the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum yesterday. Photo: Gerard O'Brien
Dunedin embroiderers are still hard at work on a big national project, titled ''New Zealand: A History in Stitch''.

Members of the Otago Embroiderers' Guild were yesterday stitching a new tapestry panel, devoted to the history of electricity production in New Zealand.

They were working in public, in the Josephine Foyer at the Toitu Otago Settlers Museum.

Two of the guild members at the museum yesterday, Jeanette Trotman (trust secretary) and Jan Letts (trust minutes secretary), are also trustees in the Dunedin-based The Tapestry Trust of New Zealand Inc, which is co-ordinating the national project.

The project's overall stitching work began at the end of 2011 and 16 of the projected 97 historical tapestry panels have since been completed and framed, including one devoted to the University of Otago, and whose completion coincided with the university's 150th anniversary this year.

Mrs Trotman said the latest tapestry panel, on electricity generation, was likely to take about a year to complete.

Guild members enjoyed working on the tapestry in public at the museum each Wednesday morning, and a strong sense of camaraderie had grown up among guild participants.

Museum visitor experience manager Tim Cornelius said the Wednesday morning embroidery sessions had also proved popular with Toitu visitors, including during the cruise ship season.

john.gibb@odt.co.nz

Add a Comment

Our journalists are your neighbours

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Become a Supporter