Sods turned for new Octagon artwork

Members of the Dunedin City Council and local runaka share a karakia in the Octagon yesterday, as...
Members of the Dunedin City Council and local runaka share a karakia in the Octagon yesterday, as ground was broken for a new sculpture, Ko te Tuhono. PHOTO: PETER MCINTOSH
A gateway connecting us with our deep ancestral ecologies and a passage to our landscape, our life and the wairua we share with the harbour is one step closer to opening after the first sods were turned for an artwork in the Octagon yesterday.

Ayesha Green’s Ko te Tuhono is a monument to Dunedin’s tipuna (ancestors) and tamariki (children), and transcends time and place.

Work on the foundation for the artwork started yesterday and is expected to take about three days to complete.

As the ground breaking began, a karakia was held and local runaka and Dunedin City Council representatives attended.

A kono (flax box traditionally used to hold food) woven by Mya Morrison Middleton (Ngai Tuahuriri) was placed by Piupiu Maya Turei during the ceremony.

 An image of Ayesha Green’s Ko te Tuhono. PHOTO: SUPPLIED
An image of Ayesha Green’s Ko te Tuhono. PHOTO: SUPPLIED
DCC Maori partnerships manager Nicola Morand said she was looking forward to seeing mana whenua standing proudly in the middle of Dunedin.

The artwork was noted as a tribute to the ongoing relationship between the council and iwi.

Mayor Aaron Hawkins was delighted to see the project finally under way.

‘‘It feels like a very long time since the DCC reinstated the budget for public art.

‘‘I couldn't be happier that this was the first piece commissioned.’’

He hoped the artwork would spark story telling and conversation.

Comments

Hawkins is delusional!!! How does he reconcile the mythylogical concept with the rejection of European spirituality. What ever this cost ($100K+) , it would have been better used helping people who can't pay their bills or feed their families rather than this silly clap trap.

 

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