Timaru killings: Extended family in South Africa trying to get to NZ

The public have begun leaving flowers and teddies outside a Queen St, Timaru house where the bodies of three young sisters were found on Thursday. Photo: George Heard
The public have begun leaving flowers and teddies outside a Queen St, Timaru house where the bodies of three young sisters were found on Thursday. Photo: George Heard
The wider family of three young South African girls who died weeks after arriving in New Zealand with their parents will be considered for emergency MIQ spaces, a Government official says.

Two-year-old twins Maya and Karla Dickason and their older sister, Liane (6), were found dead in a Timaru house late Thursday evening.

Their mother, doctor Lauren Anne Dickason, has been charged with their murders.

The 40-year-old medical professional, who arrived in Timaru from South Africa - via MIQ - with her orthopaedic surgeon husband and their three daughters just over a week ago, was remanded in custody to a secure forensic mental health unit by Judge Dominic Dravitzki until her next appearance in the High Court at Timaru on October 5.

No plea was entered at the court appearance, her first since being charged.

The family's relatives were based overseas and they only had a small network of friends in New Zealand, Canterbury's police district commander, Superintendent John Price, said yesterday.

A family friend also told South Africa's netwerk24.com the family hadn't had time to make any new friends before Thursday night's tragedy.

"[The father] ... now he is all alone over there."

They were working with the girls' family through police liaison officers to help any urgent travel to New Zealand needed to provide support for family members in Timaru, MIQ associate deputy secretary Andrew Milne told the Herald.

"We are deeply sympathetic to the family here and overseas at this time."

drivesouth-pow-classic-2.png

Our journalists are your neighbours

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Become a Supporter