African birds in garden’s aviary

The Dunedin Botanic Garden aviary has recently welcomed a flock of African fire finches.PHOTO:...
The Dunedin Botanic Garden aviary has recently welcomed a flock of African fire finches.PHOTO: GERARD O’BRIEN
Dunedin Botanic Garden has recently welcomed a new flock of African fire finches to the aviary.

These feisty little creatures can be seen busily zooming around their enclosure on the far left side of the middle aviaries.

Several species of fire finches belong to the genus Lagonosticta, a name that originates from the combination of the ancient Greek words, lagon "flank" and stiktos "spotted".

They are known to live happily among other birds in a mixed aviary and generally have a calm gentle nature with other species of finches.

This state of affairs makes them ideal for life as part of a larger mixed flock.

This finch is fairly easy to care for and very eye-catching.

There are distinct differences in colour markings between the sexes.

The male is a rich red/burgundy with tiny spotting along the back, while the female is a warm brown with a drop of red on the face.

Both have a dull yellowish ring around the eye.

When visiting the aviary, if you are quiet they may inquisitively look up, checking you out as they move about their home.

 - Garden Life is produced by Dunedin Botanic Garden. For further information contact Alisha Sherriff.


 

Comments

Is it just me that feels sadness whenever I see birds kept in cages?

Looks like they flew themselves here on a suborbital trajectory above the atmosphere and are still glowing from re-entry

 

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