More change proposed to city one-way system

Recent changes to the phasing of the one-way cycle lane lights heading south mean cyclists now have two phases in which they have the right of way, when previously they only had one. Photo: Gerard O'Brien
Recent changes to the phasing of the one-way cycle lane lights heading south mean cyclists now have two phases in which they have the right of way, when previously they only had one. Photo: Gerard O'Brien
More changes could be coming to Dunedin's one-way system.

Barnes Dance trials are being proposed by the NZ Transport Agency for the two Albany St intersections in Cumberland and Great King Sts.

NZTA project manager Simon Underwood said while the proposal was primarily focused on improving the safety of pedestrians, it would also mean changes for cyclists using the one-way cycle lane.

Cyclists riding south in the cycle lane have to stop at the crossing outside the University of Otago central library and to cross from the left side of the road to the right.

A Barnes Dance meant cyclists would be able to move diagonally across the intersection.

The Barnes Dances are just one of a set of changes the NZTA is making to the cycle lanes after they received criticism from a number of cyclists.

Cyclists had complained they spent more time waiting at intersections than moving while riding south, which led some to ditch the cycle lane for the road.

Based on feedback, the NZTA had changed the phasing of the lights, which meant the cycle phase ran both at the start and finish of the highway traffic green phase, Mr Underwood said.

Initially, the cycle phase timing would be kept short, as turning traffic also needed to clear the intersection, but it could be adapted through the road detection system or monitoring, he said.

Each intersection would would continue to be monitored.

The Dunedin City Council has already installed seven Barnes Dances at central city intersections, and has one more planned, for the intersection of Great King and St Andrew Sts.

Council transport manager Richard Saunders said the council was aware and supportive of the NZTA's plans.

tim.miller@odt.co.nz

Comments

"improving the safety of pedestrians"....Excuse me?...What pedestrians...!?!
The vast majority of traffic in these areas is motor driven. Given the closure of cadburys and the very small number of shops in this area, it's become damned difficult to find any foot traffic.
Even the main street of Dunedin is a lot quieter these days. But hey, let's just simply inconvenience Dunedin drivers, once again!

So, this begs the question? Where exactly are all these pedestrians the DCC and NZTA are determined to keep safe?...Obviously most of them are in their cars trying desperately to navigate roads that the DCC have decided are to be prioritised for cyclists and phantom pedestrians! ... These decision makers simply defy belief!

Not only are these intersections right beside the University, Polytech and Otago Museum (all high pedestrian traffic areas), they're on the main route from George Street to the stadium - great place to put them I reckon! I'm sure the rest of Dunedin isn't ignorant enough to need an explanation though...

Ignorant? That's a lovely way to talk about those who have a differing opinion...

Considering the numerous pedestrian/cyclist safety improvements in this area over the years, I wonder if it's best simply ban all vehicles, if people can't navigate this area without having an accident....?
Students are the worst at crossing against the lights. To make them wait for 2 sets of light changes is simply an invitation to disaster.
As for access to the stadium? Surely the DCC can manage traffic control once a year for concerts?! And again you forget that most traffic to these stadium events is car based....

1218b006_620x60_v2.jpg

1218b006_620x40_v2.jpg