Rockers thrill audience as their timeless talents shine

Don Henley introduces Deacon Frey, son of late Eagles band member Glenn Frey. PHOTO: CRAIG BAXTER
Don Henley introduces Deacon Frey, son of late Eagles band member Glenn Frey. PHOTO: CRAIG BAXTER
Eagles fans join a walking bus to the concert.
Eagles fans join a walking bus to the concert.
Big screens give fans a close-up of the Eagles performing at Forsyth Barr Stadium on Saturday.
Big screens give fans a close-up of the Eagles performing at Forsyth Barr Stadium on Saturday.
Fans take to their feet.
Fans take to their feet.
Two Eagles aficionados capture the moment.
Two Eagles aficionados capture the moment.
New Zealand singer-songwriter Marlon Williams opens for the Eagles at Forsyth Barr Stadium.
New Zealand singer-songwriter Marlon Williams opens for the Eagles at Forsyth Barr Stadium.

The Eagles have huge musical talents, a legacy and following which spans 40 years.

A packed stadium, (fittingly dubbed by Don Henley as The Greenhouse), witnessed them resurrected and in full flight.

Their melodies are as infectious, their rock as hard and as powerfully virtuosic, their finely crafted lyrics just as punchy and their clearly articulate voices and close harmonies as impressive as ever.

Their playlist featured the tried and true, from Schmit's Bee Gees styled ballad I Can't Tell You Why through to the tungsten classic rock of Walsh's Rocky Mountain Way with many highlights such as Witchy Woman in between.

Deacon Frey fits his father's shoes snugly and made great work of Peaceful Easy Feeling.

Vince Gill's New Kid in Town and Lying Eyes had no trouble in getting the audience singing.

However, it is the bad boy of the group, Joe Walsh, who stands out for his blazing brilliance on the guitar, his racked Joe Cocker-like voice and for his performance dedication, particularly in Survival in the City, I Know What You're Doing, and the standout number Walk Away.

The show just kept on gaining momentum right through the encores, Fast Lane and Hotel California till the quieter Desperado sent the audience home, replete and all smiles.

For Marlon Williams and the Yarra Benders, to have come from playing at Chicks Hotel to opening for the Eagles within a scant two years is a just reward for their musicianship and appeal.

Standout numbers from Williams included the sensuous Come to Me, the guitar harmonies in Dark Child, the bluesy keyboard in Being Somebody, the doleful balladry of Nobody Gets What They Want Anymore and, of course, the echoes of Roy Orbison and Howard Morrison in Make Way for Love.

 - Marian Poole

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