The salmon didn’t get away — they didn’t turn up

Bathed in early morning light yesterday, a fisherman takes part in the Otago Salmon Anglers’...
Bathed in early morning light yesterday, a fisherman takes part in the Otago Salmon Anglers’ Association fishing competition. PHOTOS: LINDA ROBERTSON
Forget the pub with no beer.

What would happen if you had a Dunedin salmon fishing competition and no-one caught a salmon?

More than 200 people entered the latest Otago Salmon Anglers’ Association fishing competition, held over the weekend, but not a single salmon above the 45cm lower size limit was caught, association committee member Gavin Cameron said.

One person caught a 10cm-long salmon on Saturday but it had to be returned to the harbour, he said.

Competition prizes totalled $10,000.

There had been one other time in the annual competition’s history, about eight years ago, when no-one caught a salmon.

Before he joined the committee about three years ago, he had entered the competition for about 15 years and never caught a salmon, but a day without catching anything was definitely not a day wasted, he said.

Dave Taylor, of Dunedin, was embarrassed by the size of his 0.68kg kahawai which won the prize...
Dave Taylor, of Dunedin, was embarrassed by the size of his 0.68kg kahawai which won the prize for the heaviest kahawai at the Otago Salmon Anglers’ Association fishing competition at the weekend.
It was a lot of fun talking to friends on the wharf or in various spots around the harbour, and was a relaxing way to spend the day.

"You have a bit of a laugh, just catch up with people, share stories as well."

"It gets rid of that stress," he said.

In the competition, there were also prizes for the heaviest kingfish and kahawai.

Unfortunately, no kingfish were caught either.

But several kahawai were caught — the heaviest being a "pitiful and embarrassing" 0.68kg kahawai, caught by Dave Taylor, who was not impressed by his haul.

Association president Colin Williams believed the salmon drought was caused by the warming waters of Otago Harbour.

"The fishing is not quite as good as we’d probably like because salmon like colder water. It’s just a bit warmer than normal.

"Kingfish like warmer water, and there was quite a big one caught on Saturday, but the person who caught it wasn’t competing in the competition.

"At the end of the day, kingfish don’t usually come down this far and they aren’t as prolific down here. So it’s harder to catch them."

Mr Cameron said because there were no salmon or kingfish caught, the prizes went into a hat and were drawn at random.

Add a Comment

 

drivesouth-pow-classic-2.png

Our journalists are your neighbours

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Become a Supporter