Traditional Maori tool-maker shows how it's done

Traditional Maori tool-maker Anaru Rondon   makes an adze as the crowd looks on at the Museum...
Traditional Maori tool-maker Anaru Rondon makes an adze as the crowd looks on at the Museum Reserve, in front of the Otago Museum, yesterday. PHOTOS: GREGOR RICHARDSON
Traditional Maori tool maker Anaru Rondon yesterday demonstrated the art of customary tool-making and explained everything you might want to know about adze-making but were afraid to ask.

Working at the Museum Reserve, in front of the Otago Museum, Mr Rondon at one stage held the attention of more than 40 interested members of the public, during his 1pm demonstration.

They crowded near as he expertly used one stone to chip away at another, and a carefully shaped piece of stone for a new toki (adze) rapidly took shape.

"This mahi [work], it keeps you fit," he joked as small pieces of stone flew close to the demonstration area.

Mr Rondon uses toki to make other taonga (treasures) from wood, bone, shell, and fibre.

Museum curator Maori Rachel Wesley said the 1pm demonstration was a positive way of raising awareness about customary tool-making, and she would like to see other similar outdoor activities in future.

Add a Comment

 

drivesouth-pow-generic-1.png

Our journalists are your neighbours

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Become a Supporter