Comment permalink

Providing protection from the sun and rain, the operable louvre roof over the north-facing deck...
Providing protection from the sun and rain, the operable louvre roof over the north-facing deck also allows dappled light to enter the living space. Photos: Linda Robertson
Long, low horizontal layers of roof-line mirror the ocean horizon of this Ocean View home, a...
Long, low horizontal layers of roof-line mirror the ocean horizon of this Ocean View home, a 15min drive south of Dunedin.
The David Trubridge navicula light in the entry was inspired by one of the many microscopic...
The David Trubridge navicula light in the entry was inspired by one of the many microscopic diatoms that float around in the oceans.
Large sliding stacking doors feature on both sides of the living area. The architects say it was...
Large sliding stacking doors feature on both sides of the living area. The architects say it was clear from the outset that the house needed to be ‘‘double-sided’’, opening visually and physically to the view on one side and to the sun on the other.
Oak kitchen cabinetry contributes to a pared-back interior.
Oak kitchen cabinetry contributes to a pared-back interior.
Judd de la Roche was initially unsure about the sideboard his wife bought for the media room but...
Judd de la Roche was initially unsure about the sideboard his wife bought for the media room but has grown to like it.
Locating the master suite at the opposite end of the house to the guest bedrooms gave privacy and...
Locating the master suite at the opposite end of the house to the guest bedrooms gave privacy and the ability to modulate the size of the house on a day-to-day basis.
Like the rest of the house, the ensuite is all about the view. Electric blinds retract into the...
Like the rest of the house, the ensuite is all about the view. Electric blinds retract into the roof cavity when not in use.
Many of the rooms open to their own deck.
Many of the rooms open to their own deck.
A deep canopy defines the entrance to the house and provides shelter from the elements.
A deep canopy defines the entrance to the house and provides shelter from the elements.
The house looks over Taylor’s Creek to the beach. The couple have planted tussocks here and each...
The house looks over Taylor’s Creek to the beach. The couple have planted tussocks here and each Anzac Day the bank is a mass of red poppies.

This sprawling beach house south of Dunedin was a long time coming but worth the wait. Kim Dungey reports. 

When Carol Williamson told someone she lived in the ugliest place in Ocean View, the person was fairly sure she knew the house she was talking about.

"She asked if it was the mustard-coloured one that looked like a slice of cheese with a ski slope roof ... " Ms Williamson says, with a laugh.

She and husband Judd de la Roche had moved into the property in 2004. While not fond of the 1970s, steel-clad A-frame, they did love the area and when the opportunity came to buy the neighbour’s home, they jumped at it.

In 2011, the couple engaged Mason and Wales architects Francis Whitaker, Stephen Loach and Matt Barbour to design a new home that would sit across both beach-front sections. Six years later, they demolished the two existing houses and moved into their garage while the house was under construction.

After years of living in their garage, Carol Williamson and Judd de la Roche say it is nice to be...
After years of living in their garage, Carol Williamson and Judd de la Roche say it is nice to be able to invite friends and family over.
Extending across the natural ridge-line, the new home takes full advantage of the available width of the site and capitalises on the extensive ocean views to the southeast and the sunnier northern aspect facing the main road.

The long, low horizontal layers of the roof-line mirror the ocean horizon and because of the extensive use of floor-to-ceiling glazing and minimalist detailing appears to be floating.

"Home" for two winters, the existing triple garage was integrated into the design by using the new entrance as a connecting element. Once inside, visitors are ushered up a gently flowing set of stairs to the upper level where the ocean view is revealed for the first time through a large picture window.

The double-height living area separates the master suite at one end of the home from the three guest bedrooms and bathroom at the opposite end.

Cavity doors allow the couple to close off areas they are not using and there is an outdoor room complete with fireplace and operable louvres overhead.

Imported white oak features throughout but painted rough-sawn cedar ceilings up to 5m high give the "beachy" vibe the couple wanted.

A home automation system can raise and lower the blinds, open the front door and turn on the television, stereo, lights and heating.

There is also a gym room and an office.

Delivering their dream home was entrusted to Ms Williamson’s son, Zac Williams, who at the same time was building his own, 167sq m house a few doors away.

Like them, he and partner Tess Dibley were living in a garage but their’s had an outside toilet.

After a full day on site, Mr Williams would carry his tools along the street in a wheelbarrow and work on his own property — a punishing, seven-day-a-week schedule documented by TV3’s Grand Designs New Zealand.

At 350sq m, plus 270sq m of garaging and decks, the larger of the two houses might have kept four or five carpenters busy. Mr Williams took on only one other builder, which was cost effective but time-consuming: the build took 26 months.

About 85% of the home’s exterior is glazed, says Williams, the founder of Third Little Pig Homes, whose own home won a national award last year. Each set of sliding glass doors weighs more than 700kg and there are 5000 blocks in the external walls and chimneys, 7500 metres of timber in the roof, and 212cu m of concrete in the footings and slab.

A maze of trenches had to be dug for the footings and just getting through the soft sand to good ground was a challenge.

Mr de la Roche says his stepson was among a raft of young, skilful tradespeople who worked on the build. Like the architects, he did an "exceptional job".
"There’s nothing we would change."

Getting under way took a while but there are no regrets: "Our real estate business was only five years old so we decided to delay things a bit. And the house is so much better for it."

Spectacular sunrises over Green Island and the occasional sighting of dolphins and whales have made living there even more special.

"It’s been an absolute pleasure," Ms Williamson says, recalling how they used to drive home from work and imagine a "beautiful, long house" sitting in place of their "ugly" mustard one.

"We will never, ever, ever leave."

 

 

Comments

"We will never, ever, ever leave."

... at least not until 2026 when global warming has added another couple of meters to sea levels and there's a king tide ... but they do say 212cu m of concrete floats pretty well these days so there shouldn't be any problems ... :-)

This house is at least 6 or 7 meters above sea level, not susceptible to floods. It'll be fine in 2026 and in 2126 (ocean won't rise even by one meter by that time). Tsunami is the only possible risk factor beyond standards like quakes. But how many tsunamis NZ witnessed in modern history?
In fact most of houses in South Dunedin are in much worse position and not due to climate change but to the council who ironically pretends to fight climate change instead of adapting to it.

@Concerned
Your comment reeks of jealousy.
Haters are always going to hate I guess?

I guess some people just don't know that ;-) is a smiley face.

It's a beautiful home and I am not jealous ... I may be wrong, but I think most people would have realised that the comments I made were in jest and meant to put a smile on people’s faces during a very stressful time for many.

I have no doubt that recent and unfolding events due to the global pandemic have caused some people to lose their sense of humour and I apologise to anyone I have offended by my comments.

Wes ... I'd certainly appreciate knowing how you managed to accuse me of being a hater. Nowhere in my comment did I say that I hated anything about the house, its owners, location or anything else, but I’d certainly appreciate someone of your above average intellect, to explain in detail, just how you came to that conclusion.

I think, over time, possibly in 2017, give or take a couple of months, this house will become one of the top 10 tourist attractions in the Southern Hemisphere, rivaling Kelly Tarleton’s Underwater World and the world renowned Portsmouth Drive Molars.

... Assuming the owners can get the appropriate building consents from the DCC for construction of underwater aquarium.

Our journalists are your neighbours

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Become a Supporter