Getting in deep at Omarama hot spot

Sally Rae tries out one of the hot tubs.
Sally Rae tries out one of the hot tubs.
Sally Rae got into a bit of hot water in Omarama recently - up to her neck, in fact.

Trying out one of the hot tubs at Omarama's new business venture, Hot Tubs Omarama, which opened earlier this month, was a tough job, but somebody had to do it.

Out came the togs which have seen minimal use since they were purchased more than 10 years ago for a celebrity swimming race against Danyon Loader.

I cannot remember much about the race but I can recall the horror when I read the label on the togs in the changing shed, about five minutes before splash-down, and it said: "warning, these may turn transparent when wet".

Duh.

No such fears at Omarama.

With a private, secluded site, there was no need to worry about spectators.

Going commando, I hasten to add, was not an option.

Having covered a few nudist festivals in my reporting career, I had seen many birthday suits - and they weren't always a good look.

So there I was.

Sitting in a red cedar hot tub, looking out on the man-made pond in the centre of the complex and surrounded by extensive native plantings and rock features, with the mountains in the distance and that big blue Omarama sky overhead.

The water was pleasantly hot, the controls were idiot-proof - lift a flap for more heat, turn on a tap to cool it down, push a button for bubbles - and the atmosphere was altogether idyllic.

Owners Lance and Jan Thomas, along with family and friends, have worked hard over the past four years to bring the project to fruition.

There are eight private tubs, including an accessible tub, two private wellness pods and a public sauna.

The couple have consent to expand to include another 10 sites and another pond.

 

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