Name change on way for popular Aussie sweets

Nestle will change the name of two popular Australian confectionery products, Red Skins and Chicos sweets, the food and beverage giant says, amid a global debate over racial inequality.

The move is part of the corporate world's reckoning with the treatment of African Americans, following anti-racism protests triggered by the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis late last month.

"These names have overtones which are out of step with Nestlé’s values, which are rooted in respect," the company said in a statement on its website. "While new names have not yet been finalised, we will move quickly to change these names."

Redskin is a slang term widely deemed offensive that refers to Native Americans, while chico, which translates to "boy" in Spanish, can be offensive to those of Latin American descent.

Last week, PepsiCo Inc said it would change the name and brand image of its Aunt Jemima pancake mix and syrup, which have been criticized as racist.

Following PepsiCo's move, the makers of Uncle Ben's rice, owned by Mars Inc; Mrs. Butterworth's syrup, owned by ConAgra Brands Inc and Cream of Wheat porridge, owned by B&G Foods Inc, also said they would review their packaging. 

Dreyer’s Grand Ice Cream, the company that owns Eskimo Pie, has also said it will be renaming the iconic ice cream treat.

 

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