Tourists won't be missed on Baldwin Street

 For more than 50 years Baldwin St resident Ray Short has seen the street transform from a quiet, not fully paved road to a major tourist drawcard and the news it was no longer the world's steepest did not bother him much. Photo: Gregor Richardson
For more than 50 years Baldwin St resident Ray Short has seen the street transform from a quiet, not fully paved road to a major tourist drawcard and the news it was no longer the world's steepest did not bother him much. Photo: Gregor Richardson
Most Baldwin St residents reacted positively to the news their street was no longer the world's steepest, but not everyone is happy to see the title gone.

Resident of 53 years Ray Short said he was quite happy the street was no longer the world's steepest.

When Mr Short and his wife first moved in, the street was not yet completely paved and nobody took much notice of its gradient.

But the increase in the number of visitors meant many residents felt it was no longer their street, he said.

''They can be a bit unruly at times; they'll walk right up to your garage and they'll walk right up to your windows and take photos. It can all be a bit unnerving at times.''

Another longtime resident, Liisa Tate-Manning, said she had endured the disruption caused by tourists while living on the street for about 30 years.

That included tourists parking over her driveway or peering in her windows, although most were polite, she said.

Beverly McLay said she felt quite sad when she heard the news and thought most Dunedin residents would, in time, come to miss the title.

As tourists could see over her fence and into her garden, many stopped to talk about the flowers and life in general, including one visitor who returned with a gift, she said.

''I've had one guy who's come back here twice now and each time he's brought me back some chocolate and left me a wee note.''

tim.miller@odt.co.nz

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