Never released Lennon recording sells for $83k

Yoko Ono and John Lennon arrived in northern Denmark in late December 1969 and stayed at an...
Yoko Ono and John Lennon arrived in northern Denmark in late December 1969 and stayed at an isolated farm for more than a month, the auction house says. Photo: Getty Images
A cassette tape recording of an interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, including a never-released song, made while they visited Denmark in 1970 has sold for 370,000 Danish crowns ($NZ83,788) at auction.

The tape, featuring the unreleased song Radio Peace, was recorded on January 5 in 1970 by four 16-year-old Danish boys who succeeded in getting an interview with the couple for a school magazine.

Bids for the cassette tape, which was put up for sale along with photographs from the meeting by the former school boys, started at 100,000 crowns. The lot was valued between 200,000 and 300,000 crowns before the auction in Copenhagen on Tuesday.

It was not immediately known who bought the recording.

Polariods and a cassette with the recording of Danish schoolboys' interviews with John Lennon and...
Polariods and a cassette with the recording of Danish schoolboys' interviews with John Lennon and Yoko Ono were for sale at Bruun Rasmussen Auction House. Photo: Ritzau Scanpix/Philip Davali via Reuters
During the 33-minute recording, Lennon speaks about the couple's peace campaign, his frustration with the Beatles' image and the length of his hair.

The recording also features Lennon and Ono humming along to Christmas songs while dancing around a Christmas tree, Lennon playing the guitar and the couple singing Give Peace a Chance and Radio Peace.

The up-tempo song, which repeats the words "this is Radio Peace," refers to a radio station of the same name that Lennon and Ono hoped to establish in Amsterdam, the auction house said.

The couple arrived in northern Denmark in late December 1969 and stayed at an isolated farm for more than a month, according to the auction house.

Seller Karsten Hoejen takes one last picture of his items. Photo:  Ritzau Scanpix/Philip Davali...
Seller Karsten Hoejen takes one last picture of his items. Photo: Ritzau Scanpix/Philip Davali via Reuters
On the recording, the teenage boys ask how they can aid Lennon and Ono in their quest for world peace, to which Lennon responds: "If you can't think of any idea yourself, imitate what we do. Just sit down and think, what can I do locally for peace?"

One of the four owners of the recording, Karsten Hojen, now 68 years old, was present at the auction. He was glad he was able to pass on the message of peace by the famous couple to the new owner.

"The meeting with John Lennon and Yoko Ono has had a great impact on our lives because we saw them as a kind of political prophets and symbols of peace," Hojen said in a statement.

"I hope the new owner will enjoy listening to our conversation and be inspired in the same way we were 50 years ago." 

 

suv-updated-banner_1.jpg

Our journalists are your neighbours

We are the South's eyes and ears in crucial council meetings, at court hearings, on the sidelines of sporting events and on the frontline of breaking news.

As our region faces uncharted waters in the wake of a global pandemic, Otago Daily Times continues to bring you local stories that matter.

We employ local journalists and photographers to tell your stories, as other outlets cut local coverage in favour of stories told out of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch.

You can help us continue to bring you local news you can trust by becoming a supporter.

Become a Supporter