Work on fish pass recognised

Fred Inder earned himself many titles in his life.

While the Te Anau fisherman, conservationist, community advocate and family man died last year, on the first day of lockdown, his work on the Manapouri Lake Control Fish Pass was recognised this week.

Family members from near and not-so-near gathered at the Mararoa Weir site on Tuesday, where his wife of 68 years unveiled a memorial plaque.

Alva Inder unveils the memorial plaque dedicated to her husband Fred on Tuesday. PHOTO: LAURA SMITH
Alva Inder unveils the memorial plaque dedicated to her husband Fred on Tuesday. PHOTO: LAURA SMITH
Alva Inder farewelled her husband at a time when Covid-19 restrictions made it hard, but she said being with family now helped.

‘‘I’d never have survived without my family.’’

Fred Inder holds some of the many awards he received. PHOTO: THE NEW ZEALAND HERALD
Fred Inder holds some of the many awards he received. PHOTO: THE NEW ZEALAND HERALD
It was an honour to have gathered at the place where her husband had spent many hours working; Mr Inder was involved in the design and commissioning of the fish pass in the late 1990s and also had input into the redesign of the structure, which was recently completed.

He managed the passage from the time it was installed until his health stopped him from being able to a few years ago.

Mr Inder worked for Meridian Energy for more than 20 years looking after water quality and the fish pass on the Lower Waiau River. Beyond this, he was a long-standing Southland Fish and Game councillor, Waiau Fisheries and Habitat Trust trustee, a Lakes Manapouri Te Anau and Monowai Lakes guardian and a member of the Waiau Working Party.

His daughter, Viv Tamblyn, said her father had a deep commitment to the environment and Te Anau community.

‘‘[He] worked countless voluntary hours, over nearly 30 years, in his determination to make a difference.

He was ‘‘a man we all loved and respected and were proud to call dad. We miss him.’’

laura.smith@odt.co.nz

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