Bylaw change would restrict jet-boat use

No more? Jet-boats will be a rare sight on this stretch of the Clutha River, near Albert Town, if...
No more? Jet-boats will be a rare sight on this stretch of the Clutha River, near Albert Town, if proposed amendments to the Queenstown Lakes District Council's navigation safety bylaw are adopted. PHOTO: SEAN NUGENT
Proposed amendments to the Queenstown Lakes District Council's navigation safety bylaw could make jet-boats a rare sight on the Clutha River near Albert Town.

Councillors approved a recommendation yesterday to proceed with formal consultation on the proposed amended bylaw that would result in nearly all powered craft being banned between the Outlet and the Albert Town Bridge during summer.

The recommendation from council officers followed an informal consultation period, where council proposed four options for the future of powered vessels on the Upper Clutha.

Council received 663 submissions, 277 of which supported there being a timed uplifting on the river from the Outlet to the Albert Town Bridge and a permanent speed uplifting on the river from the Albert Town Bridge to the Red Bridge.

The proposed amendment would prohibit powered vessels from operating between the Outlet and the Albert Town Bridge between December 1 and March 31 without an existing consent.

Even those with an existing consent would only be able to have up to two daily trips between 10am and 12pm from January 15 to February 1.

For the rest of the year powered vessels travelling on that stretch of river would be subject to a five-knot speed limit outside the hours of 10am to 6pm.

A year-round permanent speed uplifting would be implemented between Albert Town Bridge and the Red Bridge.

QLDC regulatory manager Lee Webster said the proposal was recommended "to provide greater protection for the high and growing volume of passive users of the Upper Clutha during the summer months".

"Numbers of passive users at other times of the year are lower, therefore a timed uplifting is considered appropriate."

The council's intention is for the process to be complete in time for next summer.

Comments

It is not appropriate to be doing more than 5 knot at any time on the river. It disturbs the banks quite markedly.

 

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