Toys given to hospital and ecosanctuary

Espen Stringer-Shaw (2½), of Dunedin, with a sequin board which shows the effect of sound waves from a sound cannon, at Dunedin Hospital yesterday. Photo: Peter McIntosh
Espen Stringer-Shaw (2½), of Dunedin, with a sequin board which shows the effect of sound waves from a sound cannon, at Dunedin Hospital yesterday. Photo: Peter McIntosh
Two gifts to the children's ward at the Dunedin Hospital are likely to revive happy memories of earlier visits to the Otago Museum Discovery World science centre.

Hospital play specialist Jackie Christos made that point yesterday after the museum donated a ''sound cannon'' and a magnetic crane to the hospital's Rotary Children's Ward ward playroom.

''It's fantastic. Children who've played with them at Discovery World will remember them,'' Mrs Christos said.

The two science-related interactives were previously among the attractions at Discovery World, which has closed temporarily for a big redevelopment.

It will reopen in December with 50 new interactives, and the Tropical Forest butterfly house is also being refurbished.

Ward charge nurse manager Shirley Bell was ''extremely grateful'' to the museum and the interactives would be ''much appreciated'' by the children.

Orokonui Ecosanctuary, an ecological wildlife reserve 20km north of Dunedin, is also taking on some of the interactives. Nature-related interactives, including a silkworm display and green leaf table are due relocate later this week, and some other items will be sold online.

Museum director Dr Ian Griffin said Dunedin people would remember the key old interactives ''fondly''.

Science centre manager Sam Botting said the museum had been entertaining youngsters and raising their awareness of science since the centre opened in 1991, and the two interactives would continue to raise awareness at the hospital.

john.gibb@odt.co.nz

 

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