Foghorns blare as mist enshrouds city

Trans Spring travels past some kayakers as it makes its way towards Ravensbourne in Otago Harbour...
Trans Spring travels past some kayakers as it makes its way towards Ravensbourne in Otago Harbour yesterday morning. PHOTO: PETER MCINTOSH
Many Dunedin residents woke to the blaring of foghorns yesterday, as ships ploughed through a pea-souper that blanketed the city.

Maritime rules dictate ships must sound their horns about every two minutes in fog to signal their presence to other vessels.

Thick fog and drizzly mist hung around Dunedin and the wider region for much of yesterday, and according to the MetService, the wet weather is likely to continue for much of this week.

Monarch heads back into the harbour basin through a mist of drizzle late yesterday afternoon....
Monarch heads back into the harbour basin through a mist of drizzle late yesterday afternoon. PHOTO: STEPHEN JAQUIERY
Otago Regional Council harbourmaster Steve Rushbrook said the fog did not cause any major issues on the water yesterday.

Protocols were in place for low visibility, including the use of fog horns.

"Everything went well and the ships all berthed and departed like a normal day."

There was also a lot of recreational activity on the water yesterday, but people used their common sense and stayed within view of the shore, he said.

 

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