Friendships cemented on the sports field

Arana College students support their team mates during the sports day. Photos: Peter McIntosh
Arana College students support their team mates during the sports day. Photos: Peter McIntosh
Selena de Weyer (18), of Cumberland College, skips as fast as she can during the relay.
Selena de Weyer (18), of Cumberland College, skips as fast as she can during the relay.
Alex Dykes (19), of St Margaret’s College, shows off his painted face
Alex Dykes (19), of St Margaret’s College, shows off his painted face
James Baldwin (18), of Selwyn College, plays volleyball.
James Baldwin (18), of Selwyn College, plays volleyball.
Arabella McLeay (22), of University Flats, cheers for her team during the relay at the Otago...
Arabella McLeay (22), of University Flats, cheers for her team during the relay at the Otago University Collegiate Sports Day yesterday.
Cumberland College students (clockwise from left rear) Katy Scott (18), Paris Marshall (18),...
Cumberland College students (clockwise from left rear) Katy Scott (18), Paris Marshall (18), Sophie Turley (18), Hayley Riordon (18) and Briana Cate (18) during the Otago University Collegiate Sports Day yesterday.
Katera Tutua (18), of Hayward College, plays mixed touch rugby.
Katera Tutua (18), of Hayward College, plays mixed touch rugby.

University of Otago first-year students leap-frogging across Dunedin’s Logan Park was a sight to see.

It was, of course, not just for fun, but part of Orientation Week’s Collegiate Sports Day, which began with a giant relay between residential colleges, residents of university-owned flats and others involved with the colleges.

And it was no ordinary relay.

Students skipped, ran backwards and leap-frogged across the field, in an event modified to mimic movements they would have made as children.

It was the first time such activities featured an Otago University inter-college competition.

Co-ordinator Daniel Wards said the changes were made to ensure the relay was not ‘‘elitist’’ and was open to everyone.

He said the sports day was also a good way for first-year students to cement friendships.

‘‘The students have just arrived and they do not know many people yet, so it is a great way to create that bond.’’

Student Oscar Noble-Adams (18), from Salmond College, was excited, but surprised that his team was the first residential college home.

‘‘It was kind of last-minute. We had the team about three minutes before we started.’’

Games of volleyball, netball, touch and football followed the relay, which aimed to get first-year students involved in some ‘‘healthy competition’’.

Sports Day was previously held in Opoho, but was staged at Logan Park this year to show-case what the Unipol Recreation Services had to offer students.

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