Sewer odour a nuisance in Caversham

During the Easter holidays, Mr H. J. Ranger in his Chevrolet car put up a new record from Christchurch to Dunedin and back, his actual travelling time being 15 hours, four minutes. One of the conditions was that the top gear only should be used. - Otago W
During the Easter holidays, Mr H. J. Ranger in his Chevrolet car put up a new record from Christchurch to Dunedin and back, his actual travelling time being 15 hours, four minutes. One of the conditions was that the top gear only should be used. - Otago Witness, 18.4.1917.
A nuisance of which Caversham residents are complaining was brought before the Education Board yesterday by Mr R. H. Todd, who said the secretary of the Caversham School Committee had approached him that morning on the subject.

The nuisance arose, Mr Todd said, from a sewer that ran through Caversham. It was connected with the abattoirs and the freezing works at Burnside, and a very bad smell came from the vents and man-holes. It was particularly bad at the corner of School street, which so many children had to pass.

Local residents had written to the Health Department about it, and the health officer had been out, but they could not get any satisfaction. On the previous evening the school committee decided to write to the Drainage Board, the City Council, and the Health Department, asking them to do what they could to abate the nuisance.

The committee felt that its hand would be strengthened if it got the support of the Education Board. On Mr Todd's motion the secretary of the board was instructed to write to the Health Department, the City Council, and the Drainage Board, asking them to do what they could to abate the nuisance and pointing out that it was detrimental to the health of the pupils of the school.

•The new comet that the astronomers have become so absorbingly interested in since it first floated into their line of vision, may now be seen in the morning in the eastern sky. It is already well above the horizon. It has the intensity of a clear white star, with a long tail pointing almost directly to the zenith, with just the slightest inclination northwards.

The tail does not appear to taper at all, a fact which signifies that the comet, as it approaches the sun, will become a wonderful phenomenon, possibly outrivalling the great comet of 1910. The comet is regarded as a total stranger. Its periodicity is not established, since it has not so far been identified, and nobody can say when it last visited the sun.

It is supposed to have a period of anything up to thousands of years. Mr D. B. McLeod, of Canterbury College, Christchurch, states that the new comet, which is now known as the Wolf Comet, was discovered on April 3, 1916.

At the beginning of April, in this year, it was 33 times brighter than when first discovered, and had increased in brightness three times from the beginning of February to the end of March.

Through the thoughtful consideration of the different patriotic societies, and the public in general, the wounded and convalescent soldiers in the various military hospitals have been treated to many much appreciated delicacies from time to time, but a new departure is contemplated in the proposal to forward Home a trial shipment of venison.

This has been made possible by the patriotic action of members of the North Dunedin Gun Club. The deer (fallow) were shot in the Blue Mountains, and are reported to be in good condition.

That this addition to the menu of the boys in hospital will meet with unreserved appreciation is not to be gainsaid.

•A good story is told of a New Zealand soldier who has passed the dominion ''full back'' and arrived at Sling Camp. The company was paraded, and the New Zealander, who was 56 years of age, hale and hearty, was among the number.

''How old are you?'' he was asked.

''Forty-two,'' was the reply.

''I didn't ask you how old you have been,'' said the C.O., ''I asked you how old you are.''

The middle-aged patriot did not go to the front.

- ODT, 19.4.1917.

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