Great sights in nature, and on the dance floor

Pedestrians crossing Dunedin's Museum Reserve on Monday. PHOTO: ANDREW LONIE
Pedestrians crossing Dunedin's Museum Reserve on Monday. PHOTO: ANDREW LONIE
It was a lovely way to start the working day yesterday - looking through the photographs of Otago's autumn colours which you sent in on Wednesday.

More than 50 photos arrived during the day, most of them by lunchtime. My inbox was swamped! But don't let that put you off. Please keep them coming.

I usually try my hardest to reply to every email I get. But unfortunately I won't be able to do so over the next wee while as the contest continues. Sorry about that.

We will attempt to publish as many photos as we can, in both the paper or online over the next week or so. What it does mean is there will be fewer words from me during that time.

The colours are looking truly magnificent this year. I wonder if the long, hot summer has anything to do with it?

Here's a wee tip - when you take your photo, keep in mind the unusual element which may lift it above being just a nice picture. And it's always good to get people in them too.

For the artists out there, I'd also love to see any autumn landscapes or colours you have painted this season, be they in watercolour, acrylic or oil.

Which way up does this go? Pinders Pond, just south of Roxburgh, this week. PHOTO: DAVID LESLIE
Which way up does this go? Pinders Pond, just south of Roxburgh, this week. PHOTO: DAVID LESLIE
Barnes Dance

It's good to see Dunedin folk getting the hang of these diagonal pedestrian crossings again.

Those first, tentative steps on the asphalt dance floor have been consigned to the past. Instead, now I see confident dancers and determined moves on city streets. Have a look at the movement of the long, green legs on the screen to understand the louche style you are meant to exhibit as you cross. I tried it and got some very funny looks.

The greatest thing I reckon is the clock counting down the seconds you have left to get across. This is definitely good for safety and hopefully makes people think again about attempting last-minute dashes ahead of cars.

Mt Cargill view

I haven't been up to the summit of Mt Cargill for a bit over 15 years. Last time was with my then 5-year-old son Joe and an ODT colleague. The view was tremendous. It was August and bitterly cold. And then it started to snow. I recall it was quite a magical moment.

Poplar view. Taken near Albert Town. PHOTO: CHRIS ASPINALL
Poplar view. Taken near Albert Town. PHOTO: CHRIS ASPINALL
Loris Bain writes to say she she enjoyed the articles earlier this week on Mt Cargill.

"I often go up the road, from Pine Hill to the top, to what must be the most spectacular 360-degree view around - on a nice day! But the road is in terrible condition at present.

"I'm sure any other city would actively promote this vista as a `must do' for visitors etc. A rotating restaurant with gondolas running up over the bush from Northeast Valley would really be a wonderful asset for the city.

"But of course this is Dunedin, with the gravel road always undermaintained so as to not encourage visitors. It is owned/maintained by the transmission company I understand, for tower access and maintenance, but surely the Dunedin City Council could provide some assistance to improve matters?"

Fly agaric - Amanita muscaria - spreading across the lawn in Wanaka. PHOTO: KEITH BARCLAY
Fly agaric - Amanita muscaria - spreading across the lawn in Wanaka. PHOTO: KEITH BARCLAY
Thanks Loris. An interesting idea about the revolving restaurant. I think I'd rather the summit retained its wild and remote character. But a better road up there would certainly be a good move.

Anzac Day warrior

Regular eagle-eyed attenders of the Anzac Day dawn service in Dunedin's Queens Garden may have noticed there was no Maori warrior standing guard on the cenotaph, alongside guards from the navy, air force and army.

The warrior is widely admired for standing in little more than a piupiu (flax skirt-like garment), in freezing cold pre-dawn temperatures.

Dunedin RSA president and dawn service co-ordinator Lox Kellas says the Maori warrior is always a Maori member of the military.

Unfortunately, the person who usually fills the role is on a posting overseas this year and there was no-one else who could do it.

 

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